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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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January 2010 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: February 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for January 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Elevated Cytokines May Point to RA Before Disease Onset

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Rheumatoid arthritis patients develop elevated levels of several cytokines, cytokine-related factors, and chemokines before onset of the disease, thus providing a potential opportunity for early identification, according to a study in the February issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Ulipristal Acetate Found Effective Emergency Contraception

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For women who require emergency contraception, ulipristal acetate may be an effective alternative to levonorgestrel, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Packed Lunches Measured Against School Meal Criteria

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Lunches that British children bring to school from home typically fall short of the standards for meals that schools provide, according to research published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
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Electromyography for Pedicle Screw Placement Assessed

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The use of triggered electromyography (EMG) may have more of a role in determining proper placement of lumbar than thoracic pedicle screws in pediatric deformity surgeries, according to research published in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Magnetic Resonance Imaging Examined in Multiple Sclerosis

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The use of functional MRI to assess patterns of brain activation in adults and children with multiple sclerosis (MS) may offer insight into disease progression among these groups, according to research published in the February issue of Radiology.

Abstract
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Policies on Newborn Hospital Discharge Updated

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The length of the hospital stay for healthy term newborns should be based on a range of factors unique to each mother-child pair, according to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Pediatric Rheumatic Disease Mortality Rate Improving

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The overall and disease-specific mortality rates for pediatric rheumatic disease patients have improved compared with the findings of earlier research, according to a report in the February issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Serotonergic Drugs May Delay Lactation

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In new mothers, the use of medications affecting the balance of serotonin may have an adverse effect on lactation, according to a study published online Dec. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
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Study Links Childhood Obesity to Inflammatory Markers

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Obese children who have not yet developed features of the metabolic syndrome are likely to show abnormal markers of inflammation and prothrombosis, which could increase their later risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
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Rotavirus Vaccine Found to Be Effective in Africa and Mexico

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Human rotavirus vaccine significantly reduces the incidence of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis and diarrhea-related mortality, according to two studies in the Jan. 28 New England Journal of Medicine.

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Insufficient Sleep May Be the Norm in High-School Students

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Most American high-school students don't get enough sleep on the average school night, according to research published online Jan. 4 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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U.S. Birth Weights Show Decline During Recent Period

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Birth weights among term births have declined in the United States in recent years, a trend not explained by maternal or neonatal factors or changes in induced labor or Caesarean delivery, according to research published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Review of Enuresis in Over-5s Conducted

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Nighttime bedwetting in children over the age of 5 years is a condition that requires proper evaluation and treatment, according to a report in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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FDA Issues Recall of Nipro Medical's Infusion Needles

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a Class I recall of Exel/Exelint Huber needles, Exel/Exelint Huber Infusion Sets, and Exel/Exelint "Securetouch+" Safety Huber Infusion Sets, manufactured by Nipro Medical Corporation for Exelint International Corporation.

Press Release
FDA MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting

Study Assesses Statin Efficacy in Pneumococcal Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The use of statins might help protect individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) from pneumococcal disease, according to research published online Jan. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Antibiotic Use for Acute Otitis Media Assessed

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A well-publicized clinical practice guideline in 2004 on acute otitis media (AOM) in children did not appear to increase the management of the problem without antibiotics, according to research published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Study Looks at Effect of Smoke on Infant Heart Function

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Early exposure to cigarette smoke may lead to a persistent reprogramming of infant blood pressure control mechanisms, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Hypertension.

Abstract
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Botox Found Effective for Children With Cerebral Palsy

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Botulinum toxin is a safe and effective treatment for localized spasticity in children with cerebral palsy, according to a review in the Jan. 26 issue of Neurology.

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Insulin Syringe Recalled Because of Defective Needle

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- According to a Jan. 21 press release issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Nipro Medical Corporation has voluntarily recalled all of its GlucoPro Insulin Syringes because of a defect that may cause the needle to detach from the syringe, resulting in its being stuck in the insulin vial, pushed back into the syringe, or lodged in the patient's skin.

Safety Alert
Press Release
FDA MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting

Study Explores Alternative Medicine Use in Children

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 8.7 million American adolescents and children used complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in 2007, according to research published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Mixed-Handedness Linked to Scholastic Problems and ADHD

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Mix-handedness, an indication of atypical cerebral laterality, may be an early indicator of children who will have language and scholastic performance problems and possibly attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Risk of Youth Soccer Injuries Higher Than for Other Sports

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Youth soccer carries a higher risk of injury than many other contact sports, with injuries such as concussion and musculoskeletal trauma occurring fairly commonly, according to a report published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Calorie Counts Affect Parents' Fast Food Choices for Children

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- If they are aware of the calorie counts of fast food choices, parents will order lower-calorie foods for their young children, though they may not order lower-calorie foods for themselves, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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20 Percent of U.S. Youths Have Abnormal Lipid Levels

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- One in five 12- to 19-year-olds in the United States has at least one abnormal lipid level, which is a major risk factor for future heart disease, according to a study in the Jan. 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Cortisol Level Shows Effect of Stress on Low-Income Youth

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Children from low socioeconomic status families have a steeper trajectory of cortisol secretion than their counterparts from more advantaged socioeconomic backgrounds, which may leave them vulnerable to health problems when they get older, according to a study in the January issue of Psychological Science.

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Later Toilet Training Linked to Childhood Urge Incontinence

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Beginning toilet training in toddlers after the age of 32 months may increase the likelihood of later urge incontinence, according to research published in the December issue of the Journal of Pediatric Urology.

Abstract
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Screening for Postpartum Depression Can Be Beneficial

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Many women experience depression during and after pregnancy and could benefit from screening and treatment, although there is not enough evidence to support a recommendation for universal screening, according to a committee opinion published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Malnutrition Studied in Babies Born to Child Brides

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Babies born to women who were married as minors are at higher risk of malnutrition than those whose mothers were married at majority age, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in BMJ.

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Pediatric Prescribing and Administration Errors Assessed

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Errors in written prescription and administration of drugs on pediatric wards are common and warrant strategies to reduce the risk of serious harm, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Disease Now Main Cause of Death in Darfur Conflict

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Since 2005, disease has replaced violence as the leading cause of death in Darfur, especially among displaced populations, according to a study in the Jan. 23 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Untreated Scoliosis Patients Show High Quality of Life

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In their 30s, patients with moderate idiopathic scoliosis report a good quality of life regardless of whether or not they were braced during adolescence, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Higher Rate Than Estimated of H1N1 in U.K. Children

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, children were much more vulnerable to infection than older people and, therefore, should be the primary target group for vaccination, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Standards Revised for Diabetes Self-Management Education

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A task force, including diabetes educators, researchers and clinicians, has produced the first update of the National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) since 2000. The new standards have been published in a supplement of the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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Tylenol Recall in Effect Includes Several Other Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- McNeil Consumer Healthcare has recently expanded its voluntary recall of some over-the-counter drugs to include about 500 lots of products, according to officials from the Office of Compliance in the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

More Information

Survival Improving for Children With Birth Defects

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term survival in children with at least one birth defect depends on the type of defect as well as the birth year and proportion of pregnancy terminations, possibly because pregnancies with the worst outlook are being terminated, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Editorial

Low-Risk Criteria Help Guide Care for Infants With Fever

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In most cases, infants with fever who meet low-risk criteria should be closely observed but may not require antibiotics, sparing associated adverse events, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Toddlers With Burns Should Also Be Checked for Fractures

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Young children with burns suspected to have been caused by abuse should also be routinely evaluated for fractures, according to an analysis published online Jan. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Chinese School Children Found to Have High Levels of Stress

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Primary school children in China's highly competitive education system commonly experience psychosomatic symptoms as a result of school pressure-related stress, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Skin Cancer Checks Needed for Patients on Voriconazole

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients receiving long-term treatment for fungal infections who show signs of photosensitivity or chronic photodamage should be monitored for skin cancer formation, according to an article published online Jan. 18 in the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
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Child Immunizations Confer Gastroenteritis Protection

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A complete series of immunizations with pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) offers highly effective protection against pediatric rotavirus acute gastroenteritis, while even a partial series offers substantial acute gastroenteritis protection, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Tracheostomy Tubes Linked to Pediatric Constipation

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In children, tracheostomy tubes are associated with increased constipation, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
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Cochlear Implantation Often Problematic for Children

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Children who receive cochlear implants often develop major or minor surgical complications, and are also likely to demonstrate abnormal voicing, according to two studies published in the January issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract - Loundon
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Abstract - Holler
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Smoke Linked to Sleep Issues for Children With Asthma

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Children with asthma who are exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS) have more sleep problems, according to research published online Jan. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Number of People Infected by H1N1 Reaches 55 Million

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- On Jan. 15, federal officials reported that, from mid-April through mid-December, an estimated 55 million people in the United States were infected with H1N1 influenza, including approximately 11,200 who died.

CDC MMWR
H1N1 Estimates

Constipation and Behavioral Problems in Children Studied

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Behavioral problems are three to four times more common in Dutch children with functional constipation than children in the general population, according to research published online Jan. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Task Force Recommends Obesity Screening for Children

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians should screen children for obesity at ages 6 years and older and refer them when necessary to programs containing dietary, physical activity, and behavioral counseling elements, according to a U.S. Preventive Services Task Force statement published online Jan. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Commentary (subscription or payment may be required)

Trial Evaluates Treatments for Aphakia in Infants

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- A randomized trial is examining the benefit of intraocular lens (IOL) implantation during cataract removal, or contact lenses after surgery, in infants younger than 6 months old, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
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Imaging May Help Identify a Biomarker of Autism

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Autistic children have right-hemisphere delays in their response to a range of auditory frequencies, suggesting abnormal maturation of the auditory system, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in Autism Research.

Abstract
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Training Program Shown to Benefit Female Soccer Players

THURSDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A simple preventive training program may significantly reduce knee injuries in teenaged girls who play soccer, according to a study in the Jan. 11 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Rates of Overweight and Obesity May Be Stabilizing

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Although the prevalence of overweight and obesity is still high in adults and children in the United States, the rates appear to be stabilizing in the past decade, according to two studies published online Jan. 13 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Flegal
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Bifocals Appear to Slow Myopic Progression in Children

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Bifocal lenses can slow myopic progression in children with high rates of the condition, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Reduced-Energy Meals May Under-State Energy Content

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Meals sold as reduced energy by supermarkets and restaurants may under-state the caloric content by a significant amount, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

Abstract
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Study Confirms Steroid Efficacy for Sore Throat Pain

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Steroids are an effective adjuvant treatment for relieving sore throat pain, according to a study in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Psychotherapy May Help Prevent Teenage Weight Gain

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) may help adolescent girls who are at risk for obesity to avoid excess weight gain, according to a study in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

Abstract
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Central Line Care Key to Less Pediatric Blood Infections

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- In pediatric intensive care units, central line maintenance practices have the biggest impact on reducing catheter-associated bloodstream infections, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Biomedical Research Funding Shows Decline in 2008

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- After increasing since 1994, annual funding for biomedical research topped out at $90.2 billion in 2007 and began to decline in 2008, according to a study in the Jan. 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial

Models Assess Effect of School Closures in Flu Pandemic

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- As an isolated approach, closing schools would have a limited effect on an influenza pandemic, but lengthy closures could forestall the peak of the epidemic and allow for other strategies such as vaccinations to be implemented, according to research published online Dec. 23 in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice.

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Funding Linked to State Obesity Legislation

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- States receiving funding from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's obesity-related programs were more likely to pass obesity-related legislation, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

Abstract
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Clinical Benefits of Circumcision Remain Unclear

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Although strong evidence shows that circumcision can prevent HIV infection in sub-Saharan African men, it's unclear if the procedure is associated with an overall reduced risk of sexually transmitted infections, urinary tract infections or penile cancer, according to a study in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Teens Open to Pediatricians' Suicide Prevention Efforts

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents and their parents often underestimate the risk of suicide and would welcome more suicide prevention efforts by pediatricians, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Pediatrics, while a study in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine found that physicians need to be clear, sensitive and supportive when asking depressed patients about their risk of suicide.

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Neonatal Molluscum Infections Likely Vertically Transmitted

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal molluscum contagiosum infections are probably transmitted vertically, based on the findings of a case study published online Jan. 11 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Prevalence of Obesity in English Youth Increasing

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In England, obesity in children and adolescents will increase dramatically by 2015 if current trends continue, especially in young people from less advantaged socioeconomic groups, according to a study in the February issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
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Simple 'Cough Trick' Helps Children Cope With Shots

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A simple intervention in which children cough at the moment of needle puncture during routine vaccinations may reduce the perception of pain by some children, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Children's Movies Found to Depict Many Unsafe Practices

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Although there has been a big improvement in the depiction of safety practices in movies targeted at children, there is still widespread depiction of unsafe acts with no portrayal of the consequences, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Pediatrics.

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Childhood Cancer Survivor Cardiovascular Risk Studied

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of childhood cancer are at increased cardiovascular risk as they age if they were treated with full-body or torso irradiation or are physically inactive, according to a study in the January Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
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Right Restraint Use Key for Children's Car Safety

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- There is a population-level benefit to interventions aimed at improving the rate of children's restraint use in cars, with promotion of age-appropriate restraints yielding the greatest benefits, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Predictors of Middle-Age Lung Function Evaluated

FRIDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Lung function in middle age is impacted by lifestyle factors, such as smoking, but also early childhood factors, such as low birth weight and respiratory infection, according to a study in the January issue of Chest.

Abstract
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Fat Mass May Have Greater Effect on Bone Mass in Girls

FRIDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- While lean body mass is the main determinant of bone mass in both boys and girls, fat mass has a greater influence on bone mass in girls, according to a study published online Dec. 11 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
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Varicella Risk Soars Among Unvaccinated Children

FRIDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose parents refuse to have them vaccinated for varicella are at nearly nine times the risk of contracting the disease as children who are vaccinated, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Rates of Eye Conditions Differ Among Minority Preschoolers

FRIDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In African-American and Hispanic children aged 6 to 72 months, rates of various eye conditions differ, according to two studies published in the January issue of Ophthalmology.

Abstract - Varma
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Abstract - Borchert
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Childhood Mistreatment Linked to Issues With Migraine

THURSDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A history of childhood mistreatment is common in individuals with migraine, and childhood abuse and neglect are associated with chronic headaches and likelihood of comorbid pain conditions, according to a series of studies in the January issue of Headache.

Abstract - Study 1
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Abstract - Study 2
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Abstract - Study 3
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Routine Child Exams and Tests May Predict Future Diabetes

THURSDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The future development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or hyperglycemia may be predictable in children through routine pediatric exams and lab tests, according to a pair of studies in the January Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract - Morrison
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Abstract - Tian
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Nurse Visits in Infancy May Lead to Less Criminal Behavior

THURSDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The female children of young, low-income women have better educational and economic prospects, and are less likely to commit crimes, if they receive nurse visits during infancy, according to a follow-up study in the January issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Retraining Device Helps Obese Children Change Eating Habits

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- A computerized device can help obese adolescents change their eating habits, and is a useful adjunct to lifestyle changes to lose weight, according to a study published online Jan. 5 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Gap in Childhood Vaccination Coverage Is Narrowing

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccination coverage of American children is improving, with the gap between various sociodemographic groups narrowing, according to a study published online Jan. 5 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Parental Mental Illness Found to Affect Risk of SIDS

TUESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is higher among babies whose parents have undergone inpatient psychiatric care, particularly if both parents have been hospitalized or if an alcohol or drug disorder was diagnosed, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Acetaminophen Use Not Linked to Major Birth Defects

TUESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The use of acetaminophen during the first trimester of pregnancy is not associated with a higher risk of major birth defects, according to a study in the January issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Using Kitchen Spoons for Meds Often Leads to Dosing Errors

TUESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Using kitchen spoons to measure out liquid medicine leads to dosing errors that are small but could accumulate over time, according to a study in the Jan. 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Parents, Doctors of Childhood Cancer Survivors Studied

MONDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Many pediatric oncologists are not comfortable with their older patients who survived childhood cancer, nor well informed on guidelines for long-term follow-up care, according to a study published online Dec. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. According to another study in the same issue, the stress of a child having cancer does not increase the risk of the parents divorcing.

Abstract - Henderson
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Abstract - Syse
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2010 Childhood Vaccination Schedules Approved

MONDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- New recommendations for childhood and adolescent immunization schedules have been approved by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the American Academy of Family Physicians, incorporating several changes from last year, according to an article published online Jan. 4 in Pediatrics.

www.vaers.hhs.gov
Abstract
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Immunization Charts

Outcomes for Pregnant Women With Cardiomyopathy Assessed

MONDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Women with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) who become pregnant are at elevated risk for a having a cardiac event as well as adverse neonatal events, according to a study in the Dec. 29/Jan. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Schoolyard Bullying Can Also Be Harmful to Witnesses

FRIDAY, Jan. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Bullying behavior may not just be harmful to its victims, it may also affect the young people who witness it, according to research published in the December issue of School Psychology Quarterly.

Abstract
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