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Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

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January 2010 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: February 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for January 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging Examined in Multiple Sclerosis

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The use of functional MRI to assess patterns of brain activation in adults and children with multiple sclerosis (MS) may offer insight into disease progression among these groups, according to research published in the February issue of Radiology.

Abstract
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Serotonergic Drugs May Delay Lactation

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In new mothers, the use of medications affecting the balance of serotonin may have an adverse effect on lactation, according to a study published online Dec. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
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Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Supported by Evidence

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Psychodynamic psychotherapy, the treatment approach similar to, but less extensive than, full psychoanalysis, is efficacious and well-supported by scientific evidence, despite a perception that it lacks empirical support, according to an article published online Jan. 25 in the American Psychologist.

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Physical Activity May Preserve Cognitive Function in Elderly

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Regular physical activity can help an older person preserve their cognitive function and mental health, according to a pair of studies in the Jan. 25 Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Etgen
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Abstract - Dechamps
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Explores Alternative Medicine Use in Children

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 8.7 million American adolescents and children used complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in 2007, according to research published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

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Mixed-Handedness Linked to Scholastic Problems and ADHD

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Mix-handedness, an indication of atypical cerebral laterality, may be an early indicator of children who will have language and scholastic performance problems and possibly attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Calorie Counts Affect Parents' Fast Food Choices for Children

MONDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- If they are aware of the calorie counts of fast food choices, parents will order lower-calorie foods for their young children, though they may not order lower-calorie foods for themselves, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Most Combat Zone Soldier Evacuations Not Battle Related

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, non-battle-related injuries and disease account for more medical evacuations of military personnel than combat injuries, according to a study in the Jan. 23 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Cortisol Level Shows Effect of Stress on Low-Income Youth

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Children from low socioeconomic status families have a steeper trajectory of cortisol secretion than their counterparts from more advantaged socioeconomic backgrounds, which may leave them vulnerable to health problems when they get older, according to a study in the January issue of Psychological Science.

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Later Toilet Training Linked to Childhood Urge Incontinence

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Beginning toilet training in toddlers after the age of 32 months may increase the likelihood of later urge incontinence, according to research published in the December issue of the Journal of Pediatric Urology.

Abstract
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Screening for Postpartum Depression Can Be Beneficial

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Many women experience depression during and after pregnancy and could benefit from screening and treatment, although there is not enough evidence to support a recommendation for universal screening, according to a committee opinion published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Malnutrition Studied in Babies Born to Child Brides

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Babies born to women who were married as minors are at higher risk of malnutrition than those whose mothers were married at majority age, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in BMJ.

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Palestinian Turmoil Linked to Domestic Abuse

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In the occupied Palestinian territory, intimate-partner violence is strongly associated with exposure to political violence, according to a study in the Jan. 23 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Factors Help Predict Continued Opioid Use for Back Pain

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic back pain are more likely to use opioid analgesics long term if they smoke and had non-surgical treatment, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of Pain.

Abstract
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Tylenol Recall in Effect Includes Several Other Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- McNeil Consumer Healthcare has recently expanded its voluntary recall of some over-the-counter drugs to include about 500 lots of products, according to officials from the Office of Compliance in the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Serotonin-1A Receptor Gene Linked to Depression

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In a mouse model, researchers were able to manipulate the level of serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptors to affect both the mice's vulnerability to stress as well as their response to antidepressants, according to a study in the Jan. 14 issue of Neuron.

Abstract
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Chinese School Children Found to Have High Levels of Stress

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Primary school children in China's highly competitive education system commonly experience psychosomatic symptoms as a result of school pressure-related stress, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Cognitive Fluctuations May Predict Alzheimer's Severity

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with Alzheimer's disease, the presence of cognitive fluctuations, spontaneous alterations in cognition, attention, and arousal, may be associated with greater disease severity and poorer neuropsychological performance, according to a study published in the Jan. 19 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Poor Cognition in Midlife

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Metabolic syndrome that persists over years is associated with worse cognitive function in late middle age, which can be partially accounted for by occupational position, according to a study in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Constipation and Behavioral Problems in Children Studied

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Behavioral problems are three to four times more common in Dutch children with functional constipation than children in the general population, according to research published online Jan. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Imaging May Help Identify a Biomarker of Autism

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Autistic children have right-hemisphere delays in their response to a range of auditory frequencies, suggesting abnormal maturation of the auditory system, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in Autism Research.

Abstract
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Antipsychotic Use in Elderly, Prescribing Rates Examined

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients newly admitted to nursing homes are more likely to be prescribed antipsychotics if the nursing home has a high prescribing rate for antipsychotics, according to a study in the Jan. 11 Archives of Internal Medicine. A related study determined that an FDA advisory on the use of atypical antipsychotics in elderly dementia patients resulted in decreased use.

Abstract - Chen
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Abstract - Dorsey
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Study Explores Relationship Between Migraine, Depression

THURSDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Depression and migraine, particularly migraine with aura (MA), may share underlying genetic factors, according to research published online Jan. 13 in Neurology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Lengthy Army Deployments Affect Spouses' Mental Health

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Wives of U.S. Army soldiers who have prolonged deployments to combat zones may have a higher risk of receiving a mental health diagnosis. In addition, injured soldiers who receive morphine during trauma care may have a lower risk of subsequently developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to two studies in the Jan. 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Mansfield
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Abstract - Holbrook
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Editorial

Angiotensin Receptor Blockers May Help Prevent Dementia

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Angiotensin receptor blockers are associated with a significant reduction in the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and dementia, along with a slowing of the progression of the disease in those who already have dementia, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Editorial

Psychotherapy May Help Prevent Teenage Weight Gain

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) may help adolescent girls who are at risk for obesity to avoid excess weight gain, according to a study in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

Abstract
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Biomedical Research Funding Shows Decline in 2008

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- After increasing since 1994, annual funding for biomedical research topped out at $90.2 billion in 2007 and began to decline in 2008, according to a study in the Jan. 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial

CETP Gene Linked to Reduced Risk of Dementia in Seniors

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Changes in the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) gene are associated with slower memory decline and lower risk of dementia in older adults, according to research published in the Jan. 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Test Results Can Affect Breast Cancer Treatment Decisions

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The results of an assay to predict the risk of recurrence and the benefit of chemotherapy in breast cancer patients has a significant impact on treatment decisions for both physicians and patients, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Teens Open to Pediatricians' Suicide Prevention Efforts

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents and their parents often underestimate the risk of suicide and would welcome more suicide prevention efforts by pediatricians, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Pediatrics, while a study in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine found that physicians need to be clear, sensitive and supportive when asking depressed patients about their risk of suicide.

Abstract - Schwartz
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Abstract - Vannoy
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Children's Movies Found to Depict Many Unsafe Practices

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Although there has been a big improvement in the depiction of safety practices in movies targeted at children, there is still widespread depiction of unsafe acts with no portrayal of the consequences, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Pediatrics.

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Drink May Improve Memory in Mild Alzheimer's Disease

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with very mild Alzheimer's disease show improvements in memory after taking a multi-nutrient drink designed to improve synapse formation, according to a study in the January issue of Alzheimer's & Dementia.

Abstract
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Weight Linked to Response to Weight-Loss Solicitations

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults who believe they have weight problems were more likely to open "spam" e-mails regarding weight loss and buy products from them, according to research published in the January issue of the Southern Medical Journal.

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Impact of Depression on Work Performance Measured

FRIDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Employees with depression are more likely to have time off from work and have impaired work performance, according to a study in the January/February issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Abstract
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Risk Factors for Depression in Pregnancy Studied

FRIDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians providing obstetric care to pregnant women should be on the lookout for social, psychological, family and situational factors associated with increased risk for depression in pregnancy, according to a study in the January issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Childhood Mistreatment Linked to Issues With Migraine

THURSDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A history of childhood mistreatment is common in individuals with migraine, and childhood abuse and neglect are associated with chronic headaches and likelihood of comorbid pain conditions, according to a series of studies in the January issue of Headache.

Abstract - Study 1
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Abstract - Study 2
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Abstract - Study 3
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New Marker Identified for Early Alzheimer's Disease

THURSDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- In healthy older adults, higher hippocampal mean diffusivity may help predict memory decline, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in Neurology.

Abstract
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Lifestyle Reduces Depression in Breast Cancer Survivors

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- In breast cancer survivors, regular physical activity and tea consumption may help prevent depression, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Racial Differences Seen for Depression Treatment

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- There are racial disparities in the uptake of treatments for major depression in the United States, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry, while a second study found that generalized anxiety disorder is a heterogeneous disease more closely related to other anxiety disorders rather than depressive disorders.

Abstract - González
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Abstract - Beesdo
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Erectile, Depression Issues Common in Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Erectile dysfunction (ED) and symptoms of depression are both common in men with coronary artery disease (CAD), according to research published in the January issue of Urology.

Abstract
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Combining Psychotropic Drugs Becoming More Common

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Polypharmacy combining different psychotropic medications is becoming more common, according to a study published in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry, while a second study found that diabetes warnings from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration added to second-generation antipsychotic drugs have not resulted in an increase in testing or monitoring of at-risk patients.

Abstract - Mojtabai
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Abstract - Morrato
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Parental Mental Illness Found to Affect Risk of SIDS

TUESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is higher among babies whose parents have undergone inpatient psychiatric care, particularly if both parents have been hospitalized or if an alcohol or drug disorder was diagnosed, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Antidepressants Less Effective for Mild, Moderate Symptoms

TUESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Although antidepressant medications are effective for patients with severe depression, they have minimal, or even no, effect on patients with mild or moderate depressive symptoms, according to a study in the Jan. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Parents, Doctors of Childhood Cancer Survivors Studied

MONDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Many pediatric oncologists are not comfortable with their older patients who survived childhood cancer, nor well informed on guidelines for long-term follow-up care, according to a study published online Dec. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. According to another study in the same issue, the stress of a child having cancer does not increase the risk of the parents divorcing.

Abstract - Henderson
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Abstract - Syse
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Schoolyard Bullying Can Also Be Harmful to Witnesses

FRIDAY, Jan. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Bullying behavior may not just be harmful to its victims, it may also affect the young people who witness it, according to research published in the December issue of School Psychology Quarterly.

Abstract
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Self-Efficacy May Affect Patients' Levels of Fatigue

FRIDAY, Jan. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer survivors (BCS) and multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are likely to report less fatigue as a result of physical activity if they have a strong sense of self-efficacy and are not depressed, according to a study published online Nov. 30 in Psychosomatic Medicine.

Abstract
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