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Category: Surgery | Monthly Briefing

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January 2010 Briefing - Surgery

Last Updated: February 01, 2010.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Surgery for January 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Colorectal Cancer Screening Approach Studied in Seniors

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The use of computed tomographic (CT) colonography appears safe and effective for colorectal cancer screening in older individuals, according to research published in the February issue of Radiology.

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Relationship of Knee Abnormalities, Activity Studied

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged, asymptomatic individuals at risk of knee osteoarthritis commonly have cartilage and meniscus lesions, particularly if they are physically active, with patellar cartilage T2 values significantly correlated with the severity and grade of such lesions, according to a study in the February issue of Radiology.

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Imaging for Coronary Artery Disease Diagnosis Examined

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Computed tomographic (CT) angiography and first-pass magnetic resonance (MR) myocardial perfusion imaging provide complementary capabilities; the first to detect or rule out coronary artery disease (CAD), and the second to detect any resulting myocardial ischemia, according to a study in the February issue of Radiology.

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T Cells Linked to Skin Cancer After Kidney Transplant

FRIDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Components of the immune system, particularly high numbers of regulatory T cells, predict whether a kidney transplant recipient is likely to develop a type of skin cancer, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Photodynamic Therapy Linked to Oral Cancer Benefit

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Photodynamic therapy (PDT) appears useful in treating early-stage cancer of the mouth or oropharynx, either as a primary treatment or as an addition to unsuccessful surgery or radiation, according to research published in the January issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Clues Found to Pathogenesis of Lupus Kidney Complication

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Infiltrating macrophages and interferons play a key role in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis, a complication of lupus characterized by abnormal growth of kidney cells leading to kidney damage, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Electromyography for Pedicle Screw Placement Assessed

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The use of triggered electromyography (EMG) may have more of a role in determining proper placement of lumbar than thoracic pedicle screws in pediatric deformity surgeries, according to research published in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Lifestyle Affects Incontinence Risk After Prostatectomy

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In men who undergo radical prostatectomy, obesity and physical inactivity are associated with an increased prevalence of urinary incontinence, according to a study in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Obesity Shown to Impact Incontinence Severity

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Obese women with urinary incontinence have more severe symptoms than their overweight or normal weight counterparts, according to trial results published in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Pediatric Rheumatic Disease Mortality Rate Improving

THURSDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The overall and disease-specific mortality rates for pediatric rheumatic disease patients have improved compared with the findings of earlier research, according to a report in the February issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Prostate Cancer Treatment May Differ by Provider Type

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate cancer treatment for low-income men differs significantly between private providers and county hospitals, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Cancer.

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Neoadjuvant Therapy Found Beneficial in Rectal Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with poor-risk, potentially operable rectal cancer, intensification of systemic therapy with neoadjuvant combination chemotherapy before standard treatment may result in good long-term outcomes, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
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Study Supports Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In individuals with atrial fibrillation and a history of non-response to antiarrhythmic drugs, radiofrequency catheter ablation is associated with improved outcomes compared to alternate drug therapy, according to research published in the Jan. 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Imaging May Reduce Negative Appendectomy Rate in Women

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The use of preoperative computed tomography (CT) in women under the age of 46 years with suspected acute appendicitis was associated with a lower rate of negative appendectomy, according to research published in the February issue of Radiology.

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Race, Ethnicity Linked to Liver Cancer Survival

TUESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- African-American patients with liver cancer have the worst survival among racial and ethnic groups even when they receive appropriate and equivalent treatment, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in Cancer.

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Electrocardiogram in Field Can Benefit Heart Attack Response

FRIDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients suspected of having a heart attack have a shorter door-to-balloon (D2B) time and are able to start reperfusion therapy faster if they have an electrocardiogram (ECG) taken in the field by emergency response personnel rather than in the hospital, according to a study in the Feb. 1 issue of Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions.

Abstract
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Drug Found Effective During Spinal Deformity Surgery

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In adult patients undergoing lumbar pedicle subtraction osteotomy, treatment with aprotinin may be associated with significantly less blood loss than treatment with tranexamic acid, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Adult Spinal Deformity Surgery Revision Rates Likely Low

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing definitive spinal instrumented fusion for primary adult deformity, the revision rate may be relatively low, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of Spine.

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Factors Help Predict Continued Opioid Use for Back Pain

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic back pain are more likely to use opioid analgesics long term if they smoke and had non-surgical treatment, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of Pain.

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Transcatheter Aortic Procedure Assessed in High-Risk Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), using either transfemoral or transapical approaches, produces similar mortality, and both are viable alternatives for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at too high a risk for surgery, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Triple, Dual Restenosis Prevention Therapies Studied

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Antiplatelet therapy including aspirin, clopidogrel and cilostazol helps prevent late stenosis following stent placement better than standard therapy with only aspirin and clopidogrel, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Nurses Often Deeply Affected by Workplace Errors

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses are deeply affected by errors they make in the intraoperative environment and need more guidance on what constitutes an error in order to encourage more open reporting, according to a study in the Jan. 10 issue of the AORN Journal.

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Coronary Events Not Uncommon on Vacation Cruises

THURSDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Passengers embarking on cruises who are at risk for cardiovascular events should have a pre-cruise medical evaluation and bring along a copy of their electrocardiogram if abnormal, according to a study in the Jan. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Tylenol Recall in Effect Includes Several Other Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- McNeil Consumer Healthcare has recently expanded its voluntary recall of some over-the-counter drugs to include about 500 lots of products, according to officials from the Office of Compliance in the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Synthetic Polymer Graft Aids in Nasal Septum Reconstruction

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A compound graft made of cartilage attached to a plate made of the synthetic polymer polydioxanone can effectively reconstruct and stabilize a badly damaged nasal septum without complications until healing, according to a case report in the January/February issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

Abstract
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Palliative Surgery Benefits Weighed in Spinal Metastasis

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Palliative surgery for spinal metastasis can deliver satisfaction to patients and their family members in terms of improved quality of life, including neurological improvement, reduced pain and longer patient survival, according to a study in the January issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
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Tracheostomy Tubes Linked to Pediatric Constipation

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In children, tracheostomy tubes are associated with increased constipation, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
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No Link Between Appendicitis and Viral Infection Found

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Appendicitis does not appear to be correlated with influenza or rotavirus infection, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Laser, Electrodesiccation for Cherry Angiomata Effective

TUESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Cherry angiomata can be successfully treated with electrodesiccation and laser, with the latter option producing the least treatment-related textural change to the skin, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
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Specialization Can Improve Outcomes After Surgery

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who undergo emergency colorectal surgery have better outcomes if the surgeon is specialized in colorectal surgery, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Bariatric Surgery Benefits Most Morbidly Obese Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Gastric bypass surgery improves life expectancy for most morbidly obese patients, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Surgery. In a related study in the same issue, researchers report that Medicare beneficiaries have improved outcomes after expanded coverage for bariatric surgery.

Abstract - Schauer
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Abstract - Nguyen
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Nimodipine Found Beneficial in Facial Nerve Crush Injury

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In rats with facial nerve crush injury, the calcium-channel blocker nimodipine significantly improves functional recovery of whisking, according to a study in the January/February issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

Abstract
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Cochlear Implantation Often Problematic for Children

MONDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Children who receive cochlear implants often develop major or minor surgical complications, and are also likely to demonstrate abnormal voicing, according to two studies published in the January issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract - Loundon
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Abstract - Holler
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Disparities Seen in United Kingdom Cancer Care

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In the United Kingdom, social factors such as age, gender, and socioeconomic status continue to affect access to hospital care for common cancers, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in BMJ.

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MDCT Findings Linked to Outcomes Following Stenting

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The use of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography to assess plaque in coronary lesions may help predict outcomes following stent implantation, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

Abstract
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Editorial

Trial Evaluates Treatments for Aphakia in Infants

FRIDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- A randomized trial is examining the benefit of intraocular lens (IOL) implantation during cataract removal, or contact lenses after surgery, in infants younger than 6 months old, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
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Ticagrelor and Clopidogrel Compared in Heart Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients awaiting an invasive procedure for acute coronary syndrome have fewer instances of a combined end point of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke or cardiovascular death after treatment with the anti-clotting drug ticagrelor compared to standard care with clopidogrel, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Spine Immobilization May Do More Harm Than Good

THURSDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The odds of mortality for patients with penetrating trauma are doubled by the use of spine immobilization before transportation to hospital, according to a study in the January issue of the Journal of Trauma: Injury, Infection, and Critical Care.

Abstract
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More Adverse Events Noted With Stents in Diabetes Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes patients with heart disease who receive drug-eluting stents have a higher rate of major adverse events compared with those who undergo bypass surgery, although death, stroke, and heart attack rates are unaffected by revascularization method, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Editorial

Patient Education Program Increases Donor Interest

THURSDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- An educational program on living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) increased waitlisted patients' knowledge and ability to discuss donations with family and friends, ultimately increasing both the number of donations and the number of prospective donors seeking evaluation, according to a study in the January issue of Liver Transplantation.

Abstract
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Lengthy Army Deployments Affect Spouses' Mental Health

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Wives of U.S. Army soldiers who have prolonged deployments to combat zones may have a higher risk of receiving a mental health diagnosis. In addition, injured soldiers who receive morphine during trauma care may have a lower risk of subsequently developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to two studies in the Jan. 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Mansfield
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Abstract - Holbrook
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Stenting for Biliary Drainage in Pancreatic Cancer Studied

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Placing a stent to facilitate biliary drainage prior to surgery in patients with cancer of the pancreatic head and obstructive jaundice increases complication rates and does not improve the outcome of the surgery, according to a study in the Jan. 14 New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Physical Therapy Can Cut Risk of Post-Surgical Lymphedema

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of secondary lymphedema in breast cancer surgery patients can be significantly reduced by the early introduction of post-surgical physical therapy, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in BMJ.

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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Biomedical Research Funding Shows Decline in 2008

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- After increasing since 1994, annual funding for biomedical research topped out at $90.2 billion in 2007 and began to decline in 2008, according to a study in the Jan. 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial

Little Discussion by Cancer Physicians of End-of-Life Care

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Many physicians are not willing to discuss prognosis and end-of-life issues with terminally ill cancer patients, preferring to wait until they show symptoms or have exhausted all treatments, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Cancer.

Abstract
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Clinical Benefits of Circumcision Remain Unclear

TUESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Although strong evidence shows that circumcision can prevent HIV infection in sub-Saharan African men, it's unclear if the procedure is associated with an overall reduced risk of sexually transmitted infections, urinary tract infections or penile cancer, according to a study in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Imaging Groups Issue Breast Screening Recommendations

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Citing gaps in existing guidelines, the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) issued recommendations for the use of mammography, MRI, and other imaging approaches for breast cancer screening in the January issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

Abstract
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Post-Transplant Liver Stiffness May Predict Fibrosis Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In patients whose hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection recurs after liver transplantation, repeated liver stiffness measurements can distinguish between slow and rapid "fibrosers," according to a study in the January issue of Hepatology.

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First Few Weeks Most Critical After Joint Replacement

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients undergoing hip or knee replacement have a small but increased risk of death that persists for about 26 days after surgery, according to a study in the Jan. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Radiologists Respond to Report on Resident Issues

MONDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The response from the radiology community to a 2008 Institute of Medicine report containing recommendations on resident duty hours, supervision and caseloads is the subject of an article in the January issue of the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

Abstract
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Drug-Eluting Stents Compared in Dutch Study

FRIDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The everolimus-eluting stent performed better than the second-generation paclitaxel-eluting stent for safety and efficacy in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the COMPARE study, published online Jan. 8 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Post-Rhinoplasty Soft Tissue Fillers Warrant Cautious Use

FRIDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Soft tissue fillers can be used to smooth out post-rhinoplasty deformities, but silicone should be avoided and other fillers applied with extreme caution, according to an article in the November/December issue of the Aesthetic Surgery Journal.

Abstract
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Changes Needed to Update Orthopedic Education

FRIDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- There is a lack of urgency in traditional orthopedic residency training to address changes needed to deal with challenges, including the explosion of knowledge in the field, work-hour restrictions, and the limited supply of new trainees relative to growth in demand, according to an article in the Jan. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Hemodialysis Linked to Higher Risk of Colonic Perforation

THURSDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of perforation during colonoscopy is much higher in patients undergoing hemodialysis, according to a study in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
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Skin Preparations Decrease Risk of Surgical-Site Infections

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Simple preoperative skin preparations may significantly reduce the risk of surgical-site infections, according to two studies in the Jan. 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Bode
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Abstract - Darouiche
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Updated Method May Predict Breast Cancer Recurrence

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- IBTR! version 2.0 -- a Web-based nomogram to predict ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast-conserving therapy -- may be accurate in most patients with a low-to-moderate risk but overestimates risk in some higher-risk patients, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Endoscopic Sinus Surgery Helpful for Chronic Sinusitis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) benefit significantly from endoscopic sinus surgery, according to a study in the January issue of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery.

Abstract
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Cardiac Events Seen With β-Blockers, Surgical Anemia

TUESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery who develop acute surgical anemia are more likely to have major cardiac complications and mortality if they receive perioperative β-blockers, according to research published in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

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Beside Exams May Trump CT Scanning After Brain Surgery

TUESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- After patients undergo open brain surgery, a simple bedside examination may be more effective at identifying serious complications than routine computed tomography (CT) scanning, according to a study published online Dec. 18 in the Journal of Neurosurgery.

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Early and Selective Invasive Heart Strategies Compared

MONDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- An early invasive revascularization strategy for patients who present with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS) and elevated troponin T does not have any benefit over a selective invasive strategy that starts with medical stabilization in reducing death or myocardial infarction, according to a study published online Dec. 30 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Catheter Ablation Prior to ICD Implantation Found Beneficial

MONDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stable ventricular tachycardia, catheter ablation prior to implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation may significantly reduce the risk of ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation recurrences, according to a study in the Jan. 2 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Scans Identify Common Injuries After Earthquake

FRIDAY, Jan. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple fractures and lung injuries were common in victims of a major earthquake in China who suffered crush thoracic trauma, according to research published in the January issue of Radiology.

Abstract
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