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Active Bowel Disease May Increase Blood Clot Risk

Last Updated: February 10, 2010.

 

Non-hospitalized patients with active IBD have 16 times the blood clot risk as the general population

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Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have a much greater risk of suffering a venous thromboembolism than people in the general population without the bowel condition, particularly during periods of active disease, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in The Lancet.

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a much greater risk of suffering a venous thromboembolism than people in the general population without the bowel condition, particularly during periods of active disease, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in The Lancet.

Matthew J. Grainge, Ph.D., of the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom, and colleagues used data from the General Practice Research Database to match 13,756 patients with IBD with 71,672 control subjects without the disease by age, sex, and general practice. The researchers assessed the overall risk of venous thromboembolism in the two groups and the changes in risk during an IBD flare in and out of the hospital.

Overall, the researchers found that 139 IBD patients and 165 control patients developed venous thromboembolism. The patients in the IBD group had a higher overall venous thromboembolism risk than the control patients (hazard ratio, 3.4). However, during active IBD, the risk increased to a hazard ratio of 8.4 compared to the control patients. During IBD hospitalization, the risk was similar to the overall risk (hazard ratio, 3.2), but for non-hospitalized patients with active IBD the risk was dramatically higher compared to non-hospitalized control patients (hazard ratio, 15.8).

"We believe that the medical profession needs to recognize the increased risk in people with IBD when assessing the likelihood of venous thromboembolism and to address the difficulty of reducing this risk in patients with a flare who are not admitted to hospital," the authors write.

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