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Forum Name: Viral Infections

Question: Furunculosis, mouth ulcers...


 Kienitz - Mon Aug 25, 2008 2:51 pm

For as long as I can remember I have been getting lesions on my tongue. They are very painful and i get them a few times each year. the best diagnosis I have received is that they are mouth ulcers. When I was about 10 years old I began getting a rash that they originally thought was chicken pox, but since I had chicken pox when I was younger they performed a biopsy and i was diagnosed with furunculosis. I took medication and did not have a problem for a long time. Before I was sexually active I went to the doctor with lesions in my pelvic area and was told that I had genital herpes. They did not believe me that I was not sexually active. That was eight years ago and have not had another lesion until recently. A few weeks ago I began getting the skin rash (furunculosis), and a few days ago the mouth ulcers, and yesterday a lesion in my genital area. I can't help but to think that they are all related. Am I correct in this assumption? And is there a way I can treat it all at once? or do i have to do so independently? Any response would be greatly appreciated.
 John Kenyon, CNA - Mon Sep 29, 2008 7:40 pm

User avatar Hello -

If the skin lesions you describe are actually furunculosis then the chance of these, the gential herpes and the mouth ulcers (aphthous stomatitis) being related is lessened. However, since furuncles are universally referred to as "boils" means these skin lesions may not in fact be true furuncles but skin lesions similar to what shows up with smallpox, chickenpox, and other forms of herpes. Given your history and the fact that you developed herpetic lesions in the genital area (I hesitate to call them genial herpes because they may not be type II but simply part of a systemic viral infection) also argues for this. It is an unusual presentation, but your theory that they are connected makes sense and at least warrants some investigation. Assuming they are, in fact, all related, they can be treated with the same therapy. If the mouth ulcers and genital ulcer clear up but the skin lesions don't, then you could assume you've suffered a strange coincidence. Somehow I doubt that's the case.

Best of luck to you with this.

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