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Forum Name: Viral Infections

Question: Swollen Lymph node for over six months; Cause for concern?


 marcj1989 - Sun Sep 14, 2008 1:07 am

February of 08 I came down with the flu. That same week I noticed a swelling under my arm similar to what I sometimes get do to deodorant. In this case the lump was larger and firmer. It never aggravated me to much and I figured it would go away as soon as the infection left.
It's now September and I still have it. It has shrunk and enlarged several times and now I have two tiny, red bumps that almost appear like blood filled boils. This is only happening under my right arm. It is mildly irritated, but nothing that affects my movement. I feel pretty good and healthy. I'm a college student so I'm always a slight bit tired do to long hours, but when I'm rested I feel great. I haven't had a fever or had a sore throat recently. It's just this one spot under my arm. Any realistic Idea? Could it be the fact that I still use roll on deodorant. If so how can I get rid of it safely and quickly?
 John Kenyon, CNA - Mon Nov 03, 2008 9:59 pm

User avatar Hi there -

This sort of thing does occasionally happen due to deodorant use. The best way to prove that, of course, is to stop the deodorant altogether, see if the problem improves, then try using the deodorant again. If the problem flares back up, it's almost certainly being caused by the deodorant, and you can then experiment with other types to see if you can find one that doesn't cause the problem.

This also could be due to one or more ingrown hairs, in which case the deodorant still may be contributing to the aggravation of it. If it doesn't resolve with discontinuation of all deodorants within a week or two, you probably will need to be seen by a doctor and have the area evaluated and treated. In the meantime, while stopping the deodorant, you might also try applying warm, moist local heat via a warm, moist washcloth. Don't make it so hot you burn yourself (I only say this because so many people actually do make that mistake).

I hope this is helpful to you. The condition sounds fairly typical and is probably not a cause for concern, except insofar as it is uncomfortable. Best of luck to you. Keep us updated.

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