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Forum Name: Other infections

Question: HELP!!!


 chrisf19 - Mon May 26, 2003 12:41 am

Ok, here it goes. This might sound stupid, but i really need an answer if anyone knows. I live in Canada, and we have had a scare about BSE (otherwise known as 'mad cow disease') i don't know too much about it. But my question is how long does it take for the primary symptoms (Such as anxiety, depression etc.) to start to show?
The only reason i'm asking is because i had meat about 3 days ago, and that night i was feeling like crap. I couldn't sleep, could hardley breathe and felt anxious (I'd say about 3 hours later) When i finally fell asleep, i got up and my chest was in pain and i had headaches and oculdn't concentrate all that well.
I went to the hospital and they did x-rays and hooked me up to the electo-cardiogram, and said they couldn't find anything wrong with me - but i told them about my symptoms aand the doctor said it could be anxiety.

So, if anyone knows...how long does it take for symptoms to start to show, especially the latter (like the heartbeat, headaches, low concentration, eyes hurting and tingling) And could it just be an anxiety disorder?[/b]
 Dr. Tamer Fouad - Thu May 29, 2003 2:57 am

User avatar BSE (BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY) belongs to a family of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). TSEs characteristically have prolonged incubation periods and are always fatal. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD) is the TSE that affects humans and has been linked to BSE.

So humans get infected with vCJD, BSE is affects animals.

To answer your question:

The incubation time of the disease is dependent upon the type of CJD. For people with sporadic and familial CJD the incubation time is believed to be as long as 20 years. The incubation period for acquired CJD varies depending on the portal of entry of the infectious prion protein. Intracerebral infection may have an incubation period as short as a couple of months, whereas peripheral infection may have an incubation time that ranges from a few years to decades.

The initial symptoms are subtle with ambiguous symptoms of insomnia, depression, confusion, and strange physical sensations. Some problems with memory, coordination, and sight also begin to develop but are ignored as a sign of increasing age.

As the disease progresses, the initial symptoms worsen quickly and the patient develops a rapidly, progressive dementia. Involuntary and irregular jerking movements, known as myoclonus, also develop.

During the final stage of the disease, the patient may go blind, lose the ability to speak, and lapses into a coma. The bedridden patient usually succumbs to death through a secondary infection such as pneumonia. The duration of the illness can last from as short as several months to as long as two or more years.

Several symptoms of CJD can be compared to those of other neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s or Huntington’s disease. In fact as many as 13% of Alzheimer patients were found upon autopsy to have actually had CJD.

Again this means you can't eat meat and get sick in the next couple of days. It seems to be only anxiety if your check up turned out fine.

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