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Forum Name: Viral Infections

Question: Is it possible to two different infections at the same time?


 reverica - Wed Nov 04, 2009 4:15 am

Hi. I am a 39 year old woman. Approximately 3 weeks ago - I began noticing a lymph node on the right hand side of my neck had swollen to the size of a golf ball. This lasted for two weeks. I was also experiencing a stiff and sore neck and terrible headaches frequently. About a week ago - the lymph node started to go down in size and my neck mobility returned. During all of this I ran a low grade fever of 99. About 6 days ago - I began running fevers between 100 and 101.4. I began having a terribly violent cough and a little drainage from my nose. I feel awful. I have terrible body aches. That lymph node is still slightly swollen. My doctor today started me on an anti-biotic and gave me a powerful cough syrup. She states she feels I have brochitis, sinus infection, and the Whooping cough. When asked no one seems to understand the previous symptoms I had and how they may have applied. I'd love to get others feedback on this. Thank you.
 Dr.M.Aroon kamath - Sun Nov 29, 2009 9:19 pm

User avatar Hi,
A 'golf ball' sized lymph node is certainly quite big.Not all lymph nodes assume this size acutely.The 'jugulo digastric' lymph node is one that enlarges acutely to fairly large sizes in response to infections in its drainage area (sore throat, tonsillitis, acute pharyngitis etc).

It is quite possible that the lymph node that was enlarged in your instance is a 'jugulo digastric' lymph node.Even after adequate therapy, this lymph node often does not competely disappear and remains palpable (although smaller), only to enlarge in the face of yet another infection in its drainage area(infections in this area are fairly common).

However, it is best for you to consult your doctor who will be able to clinically assess the node better as well as look at the drainage area for any lesions.
Best wishes!

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