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Forum Name: Miscellaneous Nephrology Topics

Question: kidney biopsy


 dinobub - Tue Aug 10, 2004 11:00 am

Hi - I am a 64-year-old white male in good health, except for: a 25 year (at least) incidence of hyperproteinuria (1.5 - 4.0 grams per 24-hr. urine), and a 15 year history of hypertension, controlled by medication.

My creatinine clearance has been above normal,(around 160); BUN, serum creatinine, albumen, uric acid, and protein have been WNL.

My PCP has advised a kidney biopsy, which I am a little bit hesitant to undergo with such a long standing urine protein history.

If I have the biopsy, what are the risks? Also, what are the most likely (common) diagnoses to be gained by the procedure, and can they be treated, and if so, how?
 Dr. Yasser Mokhtar - Tue Aug 10, 2004 2:50 pm

User avatar Dear Dinobub,

i think that you have a strong argument against having a kidney biopsy now after 25 years and still your kidney functions are normal.

The causes of proteinuria are various and some of them are not benign but like i said it is difficult to argue with 25 years of non-progression of your kidney disease.

You did not mention whether at this time your pcp is an internist or a nephrologist. If your pcp is an internist, he will of course refer you to a nephrologist for the kidney biopsy and the nephrologist will discuss with you all the pros and cons of having a kidney biopsy at this time. If you are not seeing a nephrologist at this time, it is time to.

One group of medications is particularly useful in cases of proteinuria and has been proven to decrease proteinuria of any cause but particularly very useful in diabetics and this is the ace inhibitor group of medication and unless you are allergic to them or developped complications to them, you should be on them, examples to them include captopril, enalapril, ramipril and lisinopril.

Thank you very much for using our website http://doctorslounge.com and i hope that this information helped.

Yasser Mokhtar, M.D.

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