Advertisement
 

doctorslounge.com

 
Powered by
Careerbuilder

 

                    Home  |  Forums  |  Humor  |  Advertising  |  Contact
   Ask a Doctor

   News via RSS

   Newsletter

   Neurology

   News

 

 Conferences


   CME

   Forum Archives

   Diseases

   Symptoms

   Labs

   Procedures

   Drugs

   Links
   Specialties

   Cardiology

   Dermatology

   Endocrinology

   Fertility

   Gastroenterology

   Gynecology

   Hematology

   Infections

   Nephrology

   Neurology

   Oncology

   Orthopedics

   Pediatrics

   Pharmacy

   Primary Care

   Psychiatry

   Pulmonology

   Rheumatology

   Surgery

   Urology

   Other Sections

   Membership

   Research Tools

   Medical Tutorials

   Medical Software

 

 Headlines:

 
 

Back to Neurology Articles

 Monday, 22 November 2004

 

The sound waves are believed to seek out the clot and deliver a heavy dose of the clot-busting drug tPA to and through it.

 
 

tellfrnd.gif (30x26 -- 1330 bytes)send to a friend
 
prntfrnd.gif (30x26 -- 1309 bytes)printer friendly version
 
 
 
 
  Related
 
 

Stroke information

 
   
 
     

HOUSTON ?In a study published Nov. 18 in The New England Journal of Medicine, Stroke Team doctors at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston say they may have discovered a new tool to use in the treatment of strokes.

Physicians in Houston and three other centers used a hand-held extracranial ultrasound device to target stroke-causing blood clots during the pilot study. The sound waves are believed to seek out the clot and deliver a heavy dose of the clot-busting drug tPA to and through it, relieving the obstruction to blood flow and helping the brain heal. All of the patients also received the clot-busting tPA, and their results were compared with 63 other patients who received tPA alone.

Andrei Alexandrov, M.D., assistant professor of neurology at the UT Medical School, initially used the ultrasound device to track the efficacy of tPA, the only approved drug for treating blood clots in stroke victims. However, emergency room nurses began telling him that patients who had been monitored in this way were recovering faster than those he had not monitored. Alexandrov began a pilot study to determine whether the ultrasound itself had therapeutic uses.

"We had 126 patients enrolled in the study, with an average age of 70," Alexandrov said. "Thirty-eight percent of the patients on whom I used ultrasound sustained a complete clearance of their clots within two hours (compared to 12 percent of the patients receiving tPA alone), and over 70 percent experienced a complete or partial clearance."

Alexandrov fitted the patients with a frame similar to the protective framework inside a hard hat and then used a Food and Drug Administration-approved diagnostic frequency setting of two megahertz to single out blood clots in the brain while tPA was administered. "This frequency is fast but gentle, safe to use and efficacious. It creates micro-vibrations that work on the surface of the clot to open up a larger surface that the tPA can then bind to and penetrate," he said.

In addition to killing more than 167,000 Americans a year, strokes permanently disable many victims, making it the top cause of disability in the nation. Optimum stroke care is often difficult to obtain outside of major trauma centers.

Source

Andrei V. Alexandrov, M.D., Carlos A. Molina, M.D., James C. Grotta, M.D., Zsolt Garami, M.D., Shiela R. Ford, R.N., Jose Alvarez-Sabin, M.D., Joan Montaner, M.D., Maher Saqqur, M.D., Andrew M. Demchuk, M.D., Lemuel A. Moy? M.D., Ph.D., Michael D. Hill, M.D., Anne W. Wojner, Ph.D., for the CLOTBUST Investigators. Ultrasound-Enhanced Systemic Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke. New England Journal of Medicine. Volume 351:2170-2178.

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a doctor or a nurse?

Do you want to join the Doctors Lounge online medical community?

Participate in editorial activities (publish, peer review, edit) and give a helping hand to the largest online community of patients.

Click on the link below to see the requirements:

Doctors Lounge Membership Application


 

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 



We subscribe to the HONcode principles of the HON Foundation. Click to verify.
We subscribe to the HONcode principles. Verify here

Privacy Statement | Terms & Conditions | Editorial Board | About us
Copyright 2001-2012 DoctorsLounge. All rights reserved.