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Forum Name: Neurology Topics

Question: Brain injury after head shaking


 piotrgdg - Sun Feb 25, 2007 9:46 am

I have obsessive-compulsive neurosis:-(
And when the bad thoughts comes I shake my head very hard (like a dog when he is wet). So hard I feel pain. I do this to suppress these thoughts:-(. Now I am worried abort my brain. I have a headache for a week. Could I damage my brain after doing this? What should I do?
P.S. sorry for my bad English.
 Theresa Jones, RN - Sat Mar 03, 2007 7:28 am

User avatar Hi piotrgdg,
The headache may result actually from something being strained in your neck from the shaking. If it was an actual brain injury I would expect there to be other symptoms. I am hoping that you are receiving professional mental health treatment for your disorder. Best wishes.
Sincerely,
Theresa Jones, RN
 Dr. K. Eisele - Mon Mar 05, 2007 12:21 am

User avatar piotrgdg:

OCD is a very difficult disorder to have. I doubt that a person would be able to shake their head so hard as to cause injury to the brain without first passing out.

Sometimes, it is worthwhile to "train" yourself to substitute a different behavior for the original. In your circumstance, shaking your head to the point of headache certainly isn't terribly adaptive. If you could do something different, such as mimic the motion you perform with your head, only with your hands, then you could avoid the headache. Then, if you can do that, you might also be able to substitute that behavior for something less obvious, like chewing gum.

In addition to these techniques, there are many medications that can effectively treat OCD. I hope you are taking advantage of all the possible treatments. You should see your physician to discuss these.

Good luck!
 piotrgdg - Mon Mar 12, 2007 7:59 am

Recently I read an article about brain injury and I find this:

Diffuse Axonal Injury
A Diffuse Axonal Injury can be caused by shaking or strong rotation of the head, as with Shaken Baby Syndrome, or by rotational forces, such as with a car accident.
Injury occurs because the unmoving brain lags behind the movement of the skull, causing brain structures to tear.
There is extensive tearing of nerve tissue throughout the brain. This can cause brain chemicals to be released, causing additional injury.
The tearing of the nerve tissue disrupts the brain’s regular communication and chemical processes.
This disturbance in the brain can produce temporary or permanent widespread brain damage, coma, or death.
A person with a diffuse axonal injury could present a variety of functional impairments depending on where the shearing (tears) occurred in the brain.



I think that something like this could happen to me :(((
 Dr. K. Eisele - Mon Mar 12, 2007 10:06 pm

User avatar piotrgdg:

Anything is possiblle, of course. The only bonafide concussions I've ever seen were due to accidents or by someone else's action on the patient. But sure, anything is possible.

If you feel that you have indeed given yourself a concussion, then you should seek emergency medical treatment.

Good luck.

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