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Forum Name: Neurology Topics

Question: Questions on Massive A-Delta Excitement


 Green Xenon - Mon Apr 16, 2007 7:53 pm

Hi:

I am asking a medical question in a medical forum. Please don't get upset at me. I am not trolling or spamming.

Please read my attachment in the following link -- http://forums.studentdoctor.net/attachm ... 1175119927 -- I desperately request that someone please answer the following question. Sorry if this message annoys anyone.

Do any of the neurologists/neuroscientists agree with the following quotes from the attachment and the martial-arts website? :

"2. The a-delta excitation simulates SEVERE injury and causes the brain to releases cascades of endorphins

3. A psychogenic* blackout will occur due to the *extreme* psychic trauma caused by the a-delta excitation.

4. Pain-induced coma caused by alteration of the signals of RAS [Reticular Activation System], as mentioned on http://www.internetarmory.com/self_defense.htm

Quote from http://www.internetarmory.com/self_defense.htm :

"It is speculated that various organs of the body can send pain impulses to the brain stem indicating a severe or overwhelming bodily injury. The reticular activating system responds by producing a functional "shut down", which results in loss of consciousness within a second or two."

*Along with the endorphins and hypotension, the a-delta excitation causes ACUTE psychological trauma. Due to this, the executionee won't feel the pain, even if the hypotension, pain-induced RAS coma, and endorphins don't kick in. This is because extreme mental trauma causes blackouts even if no mechanical injury has occurred. Such blackouts are common in war veterans, prisoners, victims of natural disasters, those who have lost a loved one, witnessing a tragedy, as well as those subjected to childhood abuse or molestation. These blackouts are known to occur even in the complete absence of bleeding, head-injuries, pain-induced RAS coma, seizures, endorphins, or circulatory disturbances. The brain automatically prevents the traumatized individual from consciously perceiving the emotional agony. It’s a protective mechanism for the psyche."

Also, does anyone know how this emotional protective mechanism works?


Thanks,

Green Xenon
 Dr. Chan Lowe - Sun Apr 22, 2007 10:18 pm

User avatar I'm not a neurologist so I cannot speak definitively on this; however, I do know that the brain is quite an amazing organ. There are well described cases where the brain will cause one to pass out during times of high stress.

I cannot speak as to the mechanism behind this.

Best wishes.

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