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Forum Name: Neurology Topics

Question: spinning sensation, flashes of light, facial numbess


 katie1215 - Fri Aug 29, 2008 12:16 am

Hello to everyone,

I am a 20 year old female. I just moved to an unfamiliar town and have yet to establish any sort of doctor so I am looking for advice on what has happened to me, and how to go about finding any necessary help.
I was laying down for a nap the other day, and suddenly I was overcome with an overwhelming spinning sensation (similar to the feeling before you faint). What frightened me was that then, the right side of my face by my mouth went numb and tingly and I saw rapid and very bright flashes of light.
Then it was over, the darkness was gone, and I was just left with subsequent minutes of tingling in my face and dizziness.

I am not sure what this is, but it was quite frightening when it occurred. I also wonder if it relates to the loss of control I sometimes experience in my arm (also on the right side) when it would seemingly freeze up.

I tried to look up similar symptoms, but all I could find information on is seizures and strokes. Really any help is appreciated, both on what this could be a result of, and how to approach finding any necessary help.

Thank you so much.
Best always,
K
 John Kenyon, CNA - Sat Sep 20, 2008 9:28 pm

User avatar Hello -

What you describe could be the result of several neurological derangements, including partial or focal seizures and aberrant migraine among others. The fact that you sometimes lose control of your arm suggests a possible neoplasm in or pressing against the brain, causing both focal (possibly Jacksonion) and partial seizures. Of course this can also occur on its own for no apparent reason, and in conjunction with some other neurological problems. It can also represent transient ischemic attacks (TIAs, "nini strokes"), although that is relatively rare in a person as young as you unless you have a congenital blood vessel abnormality somewhere inside your skull or brain.

The main point is that whatever is happening, the most serious potential problems need to be ruled out first. Then everyone can relax more and concentrate on diagnosing and managing the underlying problem. If it is seizures and the cause is primary or unknown, it usually can be managed medically. If it is a series of TIAs the cause needs to be located and corrected. If it is a neoplastic growth pressing on the brain it also needs to be dealt with. There is such a large array of possibilities that I would urge you to be seen by a neurologist as soon as possible.

Please stay in touch with us here and keep us updated. Best of luck to you.

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