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Forum Name: Neurology Topics

Question: EEG shows decreased brain activity in 36mth old..w/epilepsy


 bradensmom14 - Sat Dec 20, 2008 11:29 pm

My 36mth old son was just dx'd with epilepsy this week due to his seizures. However, his EEG showed a decrease in or slow brain activity several times during. So, my question is what does this mean? I've heard that this can mean memory loss, but I just don't think that is the case with him, he shows no signs of that, in fact he seems to remember everything. His neuro only stated that this could mean another problem with his brain and has ordered another EEG to see if this happens again. Another issue he is having is night sweats with hypothermic temperatures, ranging from 92-93 degrees(rectally). We have also noticed a drop in his O2 and his HR these during these episodes. They range from with O2 being 83-94..and HR in the 70's..but this onl happens on those nights when he's sweating. Neuro wants to see if seizure meds help with these problems, if not will look into other things. His genetics mentioned possibly an autonomic disorder. I'm just looking for some answers. His other diagnosis are listed in my signature, if needed. Thanks for taking time to read this and for any input. Thank you.
 John Kenyon, CNA - Mon Dec 22, 2008 11:33 pm

User avatar Hello -

This is an odd presentation you describe, during the EEG, with intermittent slowing of brain activity. While there are some relatively obscure brain disorders which could be causing this, the other symptoms (such as the nocturnal ones with general metabolic slowing and cooling) does suggest an autonomic imbalance, but it may have a central cause. Unfortunately this may take some time to sort out. I think the neurologist is on the right path so far, but it's going to be difficult for you, as a parent, to have to wait while the various, disparate factors are sorted out. It's likely to require some detective work. However, if the seizure meds seem to diminish the nocturnal problems, what's happening may actually be an anomalous type of nocturnal seizure activity. In young children it's not all that unusual for seizures to present in very odd ways that aren't normally seen beyond early childhood.

I hope this is of some help to you. Please follow up here as needed, and also please keep us updated.

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