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Forum Name: Neurology Topics

Question: Concussion questions...when to stop playing?


 ltaylo23 - Fri May 29, 2009 12:57 pm

I am a 18 yr old female. I play competive soccer year round and I have had 2 concussion in the past 3 years. I received my first concussion going up for a head ball and collided into an opponent, lacerating my forehead (i needed 8 stitches) and got a mild concussion. I stayed on the sidelines for a week because of the stitches and returned to play without any problems. In October of 2008 I received my second concussion. I went up for another[i][/i] header. The ball hit the side of my head and I felt my brain hit the other side of my skull....the AT called it a contrecoup. This time my symptoms were much more severe. Immediately after it occured, I had a headache and some dizziness. However, the next day my symptoms increased greatly. I had nausea, headache, dizziness, extremely tired, blurred vision, and unable to focus at all. Most of my symtoms persisted for about a week and then subsideded. But, after 3 or 4 weeks, I still had dizziness, chronic headaches and inablity to focus.

My question is how much brain damage did this cause and if I need to take any extra precautions to prevent any further concussions. I have heard that after so many concussion, doctors will remove athletes from play and I do not want that. On average, how many concussions will an athlete endure before they are not allowed to return to play?

Thanks

Lauren
 Faye Lang, RN, MSW - Thu Jun 18, 2009 5:47 pm

Hello Itaylo,

The number of concussions anyone can tolerated depends on how serious each concussion is. The ideal is to have no concussion, ever. However, life happens, and situations such as yours occur. You should discuss this in detail with your neurologist, but I recommend that you do not paricipate in your sport until all symptoms of your serious concussion have completely gone away. If your doctor feels you can continue in your sport, you should take every precaution to prevent further insult to your brain. Failure to do so could result in severely persistent symptoms that could effect your quality of life, let alone allow continued participation in your sport. You have already had "too many" concussions, as evidenced by the continuing symptoms that you describe.

Good luck to you.

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