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Forum Name: Neurology Topics

Question: Sleep walking, tremors, short-term memory loss, etc...


 mar1na1993 - Sun Feb 28, 2010 1:57 pm

Though it seems like the subject is kind of all over the place, it all has to relate to one subject.
My friend all of a sudden, about a month ago, became REALLY tired. She was sleeping for days and during her sleeping episodes, she'd sleep walk and she had tremors. The sleep problem reminded me of that Klein-Levin's syndrome that I saw on Mystery Diagnosis once. I also heard somewhere that sometimes sleep walking can have some connection to some seisure problem?
After this was happening, she also started losing her short term memory. I was talking to her and she said she couldn't remember what she had for breakfast, things like that... But according to the most recent news... she can't remember pretty much anything... She'll be eating and forget that she's eating (which leads her to excessive eating). She shoveled the snow and forgot the next day that it even snowed...
She also has started to act like a baby in the way that she'll crawl out of bed and take a water bottle and curl up as if she's a baby with a bottle and fall asleep again.
It's really worrying, and I thought I could get some insight somehow on the internet... I'm pretty sure it goes under Neurology topics since it has to do with the brain... But then again, I'm sorry if it goes under psychiatry or something :S
 Faye Lang, RN, MSW - Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:36 pm

Hello mar1na1993,

I apologize for the delay in responding to your concern. Klein-Levin's Syndrome does have some of the same symptoms, although it occurs most frequently in young males. A thorough neurological evaluation is certainly the best place to start with such symptoms, since there are many things that could help cause them. Certain motor-neuron degenerative conditions or early onset-dementia are only two examples. There may also be a psychiatric component, if not cause. Ruling out physical conditons first is a good approach to unexplained and/or unusual symptoms. Early intervention will give the best chance of successful treatment. There is also the consideration of the person's safety; if someone lives alone and has such incapacitating symptoms, involving family members is important. If there are no family members able to help, it may require a referral to the local adult protective services agency. I hope this information is helpful to you.

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