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Forum Name: Breast Cancer

Question: lymphnode enlargement rt axilla


 lizsheeba - Sun Feb 26, 2006 2:13 am


Hi i am 33yrs old married woman and having a 4.5yr old son,the problem i have been facing is:i noted an enlargement in my armpit which are painful about 15 months back,showed the doctor who advised a FNAC whic revealed NO malignancy, probably axillary tail of spence and later i was put on antibiotics for a long period of time.i later noticed that the swelling would increase in size just before my periods settle back to a peanut size thereafter.
A mmamography done last Jan showed dense glandular tissue,no calcification. sonography of the axilla revealed 3 lymphnode on the right side which were reactive.
A pre and post menstrual sonography revealed change in sizes of the lympnodes, pre menstrual were 11, 12&15mm while post menstrual 6,7&9mmand are reactive in nature ,and no changes in the breast tissue . The doctor told me to take a fresh course of antibiotics! i am confused i don't know what to do please guide me.

 Theresa Jones, RN - Mon Feb 27, 2006 10:40 am

User avatar Hi lizsheeba,
Generally speaking, antibiotics are prescribed for bacterial related infections. The axillary lymph nodes are located in the axillae (arm pits). They drain the arm, thoracic wall, breast. Common causes of enlargement include infections, cat-scratch disease, lymphoma, breast cancer, silicone implants, brucellosis, melanoma. Pain/Tenderness: When a lymph node rapidly increases in size, its capsule stretches and causes pain. Pain is usually the result of an inflammatory process or suppuration, but pain may also result from hemorrhage into the necrotic center of a malignant node. The presence or absence of tenderness does not reliably differentiate benign from malignant nodes.[1] Stony-hard nodes are typically a sign of cancer, usually metastatic. Very firm, rubbery nodes suggest lymphoma. Softer nodes are the result of infections or inflammatory conditions. Suppurant nodes may be fluctuant. Sometimes, following infection lymph nodes occasionally remain permanently enlarged, though they should be non-tender, small (less the 1 cm), have a rubbery consistency and none of the characteristics described for malignancy or for infection. These are also known as 'Shotty Lymph nodes'. An increase in nodal size on serial examinations is significant. The term "reactive in nature" in the report essentially seems to be stating that this is a lymphatic response to an infective or inflammatory cause rather than a malignant nature. Did your physician explain why he/she is attempting a new course of antibiotics (if not inquire about an explanation). Is there a planned re-evaluation after the course is completed?
Sincerely,
Theresa Jones, RN



References:
=========
1. Fijten GH, Blijham GH. Unexplained lymphadenopathy in family practice. An evaluation of the probability of malignant causes and the effectiveness of physicians' workup. J Fam Pract 1988;27: 373-6.
 nikkimh - Mon Mar 08, 2010 12:14 am

Hello i am very new to this site so if im not doing this right im sorry ill try to tell whats been going on with me as short as possible my name is nicole and iam 26yrs old for awile now ive had swollen node all over my neck arm pits and on both sides of my groin they don't tend to bother me so much but sometimes i get really bad pains then i rember there there but latly im extermilly tired all the time and this bump on the back of my neck were my head attachs to my spin is bothering me alot and for the past several nights i had been sweating and ill think did i wet my self and of course i didnt but i don't have health insuarnce but should i be worried o my family has died on my fathers side from caner before there 60

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