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Forum Name: Lymphoma

Question: Clustered Lymph Nodes?


 naomijones - Wed Feb 27, 2008 4:07 pm

In December I went to my regular gyno appointment and mentioned a non-tender yet movable lump that was in my left groin that was smaller than a pea. He said that if it didn't go away in a few weeks he would put me on antibiotics. After 5 weeks he started me on Cipro, yet the lump did not go away (to me it felt a bit smaller, but was still there). After the Cipro I returned to my Dr. and he felt the area saying he felt quite a few small lumps on both sides of groin. He had some vaginal cultures performed (most which came back negative, other results pending) and he scheduled me for a pelvic MRI to look at "clustered lymph nodes". I should get the MRI results in a couple of days. I asked him directly if he thought this could be cancer and his response was no he did not think so, since I had small lumps that were bilateral. Despite his response I am still VERY worried about lymphoma. I am a 31 year old African American with no history of cancer.

I'm also very worried because it is hard to find information on out there on the incidence of this amongst young African American women. So I'm not sure what to think. How common is this to be non-hodkin's lymphoma in someone like me?
 Dr. Safaa Mahmoud - Fri Oct 10, 2008 8:11 am

User avatar Hello,

According to the information you provided, these are small painless mobile bilaterally enlarged inguinal lymph nodes that did not or minimally regressed on antibiotics. Although they sound to be non specific inguinal nodes of no serious etiology, I assume that your doctor found them of concern on clinical examination.

Inguinal lymph nodes are situated in the crease between the leg and pelvis (more laterally). They drain the vulva, vagina, perineum, gluteal region, lower abdominal wall, lower anal canal and lower extremities.

Infection or inflammation in these parts result in inguinal lymph node enlargement. During acute conditions, nodes are swollen and painful.
Following recovery (usually with adequate antibiotic course) they regress in size but never disappear.

Thus nodes that regress are reassuring and those continue to grow are of concern. This lymph node group are generally considered abnormal when larger than 1.5 cm.

Most physician exclude first infectious causes by cultures and empiric antibiotic course. If no adequate response is achieved in 7-15 days other causes should be looked for. Other causes to be excluded include lymphoma and pelvic malignancies.

Complete history and physical examination are essential to define probable causes and required investigations.

Please follow up with your doctor and keep us updates.
Best regards.

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