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Forum Name: Spinal problems and back pain

Question: Cervical Pain


 criskaz - Wed Mar 28, 2007 12:27 pm

I am a 40 year old female.

I am experiencing a weak feeling in arms, hands, and sometimes legs. It comes and goes. It can last for an hour or for days, and then will go away sometimes for months. The first time it occurred was back in 2003. I had a Cervical MRI and it stated that I had posterior annular disc bulge at c3-4, c4-5, c5-6 and c6-7 and a mild loss of lordotic curve. It went away and basically hasn't bothered me often until the last few months. The weak feeling is occurring more often and is often associated with neck pain. If I lie down it doesn't bother me. Again, it comes and goes. I also occasionally have mild vertigo. I just had an MRI of my brain with contrast and all was normal. I am currently going to physical therapy.

Could the bulging discs be causing this weak feeling I am having in my extremities? Should I ask that an MRI be done again to see if something has changed over the last 4 years? Can the disc bulging get worse over time?

I was worried about having MS or ALS, but don't know much about them.

Thanks.
 Marceline F, RN - Thu Mar 29, 2007 10:02 am

User avatar Dear Criskaz,

The symptoms you describe can indeed be caused by bulging discs. The disc bulge can cause pressure on the Spinal Cord and leave you with general weakness in your extremeties, and sometime internal problems as well. When you mentioned that "it" went away, I am assuming you meant the weakness. I cannot give rationale for the going away, but typically if the underlying problem - the bulging discs- have not been repaired, then the symptoms of the problem are still there, you may just have learned to live with them. I hope you have consulted a neurologist for these concerns. The loss of the lordotic curve is also a concern, and it would be prudent for that to also be evaluated by either an orthopedic specialist or again by the neurologist. There are surgical and non-invasive treatments for disc bulge, depending on the etiology and the needed corrections. Please ask your primary physician for a referral to orthopedics and neurology/ neuro surgery.

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