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Forum Name: Bone trauma and fractures

Question: When is a hematoma a problem?


 nz2009 - Thu Jan 08, 2009 7:52 am

I slipped on ice while going down stairs and fell HARD and landed on my upper rump (rear end) with massive impact. I had hit the edge of the step. Owie!!!! I had a MASSIVE bruise that is healing nicely almost 3 weeks later but a rather large bump remains and is quite prominent. It is hard. I am thinking it might be damaged tissue or a hematoma. I am not sure if I should go get it checked. I am just glad I didn't land any higher...it would have been an expensive trip to the ER.

Anyway, do hematomas resolve on their own? How do they function and work? How long should I wait to see if it eventually goes away? Does this seem characteristic of one? I currently have a very odd contour on that right buttocks where I hit it.

Also, I checked my blood pressure with the home-device used to monitor my elderly parents blood-pressure and it was lower than normal ...quite consistently (97/60). Just a couple of months ago I was having problems with elevated blood pressure and headaches (the only trigger I could find was taking Yasmin - I stopped taking it and my blood pressure seemed to regulate). Now it is lower than normal. Could lower blood pressure have an impact on healing properly from this fall?
 Tom Plamondon PA-C - Thu Jan 08, 2009 6:25 pm

User avatar Hello,
Thanks for the question.
A hematoma (literally: a blood tumor) is a collection of blood within a specific area of the body usually the result of trauma. In your case, the gluteal area has a large bump that has not resolved. This could be a hematoma.
The body will reabsorb the blood and can be assisted with heat and gentle exercise. It is important to watch for numbness in the leg, increasing local pain or pain down the leg or up the back. Since the gluteal muscle is contained within fascia, you could suffer from compartment syndrome which may compress nerves in the gluteal area (sciatic nerve). Also, calcification build up can occur and cause a permanent hard nodule in the muscle.
Sometime physical therapy can help resolve some the swelling, pain, and any loss of motion.

It is important to have this evaluated by a physician who can make a better determination of the exact diagnosis.

Let us know how it goes or if you have any further questions. Take care.
 pjodielynne - Mon Apr 06, 2009 9:46 am

Hi,

I slipped and fell on steps as well and ended up with (according to my physiotherapist and Dr. )a couple of different hematomas. One being on the top part of my rump as well.
He he using ultra-sound on those hematomas. I get 20 minutes per week of ultra sound in those areas. He said the sound waves help break it up. I realize depending on your health plan this could be expensive, but it's another option if it's available.
 Tom Plamondon PA-C - Fri Apr 10, 2009 11:11 am

User avatar Hello,
Yes, ultrasound can be used to help with hematoma absorption.
Take care.

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