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Forum Name: Degenerative Bone Diseases

Question: Osgood schlatter in right knee, can it last more than 1 year


 wildone9026 - Fri Jan 09, 2009 7:42 pm

hi, im 13 years old and ive had osgood schlatter in my right knee for about 1 year and 4 months. it used to be in both my right and left knee, but disappeared from my left knee about ten months ago. my right knee is getting worse and worse, and the bump is becoming larger and more painfull. what should i do to treat it? will i need to get surgery? and is it common for osgood to last more then a year?
thank you for all your help.
 Tom Plamondon PA-C - Sat Jan 10, 2009 3:29 pm

User avatar Hello,
As long as you are growing, Osgood schlatters can persist.

The condition involves increased stress on the patellar tendon where it inserts into the front of the tibia. Calcifcation and chronic inflamation can develop therefore a bump may appear.

Treatment includes treating inflamation with NSAIDS, ice (regularly especially after every bout of exercise), a patella strap or brace to ease the pressure off the tibial tubercle, and quadriceps strengthening.

Physicial therapists and athletic training can help with any rehab program.

Sometimes surgeon remove the bump or ossification site but I would not recommend this until after growth spurts are done and only if the condition remains problematic.

Let us know how things turn out.
 wildone9026 - Sat Jan 10, 2009 5:32 pm

do you know why it would go away in one knee and not in the other? and my family goes snowboarding every weekend, and it puts a lot of stress on my knee. should i take sometime off untill it gets better? recently, my knee has been hurting even if i don't use it.
thanks,
laura
 Tom Plamondon PA-C - Mon Jan 12, 2009 3:01 pm

User avatar Hello,
It is not unusual for one knee to be better or worse than the other - assymetry is common with Osgood Schlatter's.

Since this condition is caused by repetitive stress on the tibial tubercle (bony attachment of the patellar tendon) then avoiding repetitive stress is part of the solution. Therefore use caution with running, jumping, cutting...and skiing.
Typically, activity levels are dictated by pain and inflammation levels but remember - pain and inflammation may not occur until after the activity ...so easy does it.

Also use ice after exercise/activity.
Consult a trainer or therapist for specific treatment and exercises.

After the bone's growth plate matures (anywhere from 14y.o - 18y.o.) the problem should cease. If it persists beyond this, see an orthopedist.

Let me know if you have any more questions and I'll try to answer them.

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