News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter   
 

 Headlines:

 
 

Doctors Lounge - Orthopedics Answers

"The information provided on www.doctorslounge.com is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between a patient/site visitor and his/her physician."

Back to Orthopedics Answers List

Forum Name: Osteoporosis

Question: muscle heat


 celticgirl2000 - Tue Feb 08, 2005 2:13 pm

When you have arthritis do your muscles feel warm even when your not exercising.
 Dr. A. Saif - Thu Feb 10, 2005 5:59 pm

User avatar Dear Celtic girl,

It can do...possibly.

Arthritis can be degenerative (due to wear and tear) or inflammatory (due to the the joint lining being inflamed for example beacuse of gout, or rheumatoid arthritis. Inflammatory arthritis is, as the name would suggest associated with warmth of the joint. Generally it is not the muscles that feel warm though. Warmth in the muscle itself (as opposed to the joints) can be as you suggest, due to increased activity. But when you are not exercising...well that I guess is more likely to be either due to systemic increased temperature (when you have a fever) or if localised to a particular area, one might expect that there may be an underlying focus of inflammation such as an infection or abscess...

Regards

Saif

|

Check a doctor's response to similar questions

 

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us

 
Copyright © 2001-2010
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME Articles

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

We subscribe to the HONcode principles of the HON Foundation. Click to verify.We subscribe to the HONcode principles.
Verify here