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Forum Name: Pediatric Topics

Question: Please Help my 6mth old boy - compression of trachea


 fierra2000 - Mon Oct 22, 2007 3:44 pm

Age, Sex, Diagnosis
My son is presently 6 1/2 mths old and has had a snoring like sound every time he inhales and exhales sense he was a month old. (At one point he stopped breathing in his sleep and I had to quickly wake him up to take in air, I'm not sure if this might be related). His doctor says it's just the compression and decompression of his trachea and that he will eventually outgrow it with age. He also stated that it was common in babies but I have yet to meet another mother with the same or a similar problem in her child. At first I was not concerned because after all he is the doctor, but as I asked around, many people have told me that this is not normal and that I should take him to a different doctor. Furthermore, my mother is an RN and does not agree with my doctor for a second opinion.

About my sons Background and History
My son is 28" long and weighs 20lbs, he's very alert, has been trying to talk and walk sense he was 3 mths old. Now he often speaks out certain words clearly and can stand and walk holding on to things around him. Asthma runs in my family but I don't have it nor does the father, my sister's daughter however has it sevierly. His doctor also mentioned it's not related to asthma. In addition, my neice has a heart diformality that was diagnosed late due to insufitient testing (same niece) and my other sister's daughter was diagnoses with an isolated CPC when she was 3 months pregnant (but it went away when she reached her 4 1/2 mths of the pregnancy).

Question
I am concerned that I'm not doing what's best for my son by listening to my doctor. Should I be Concerned?
 Dr. Chan Lowe - Mon Oct 22, 2007 9:16 pm

User avatar Hi Fierra2000,

I'd like to get a bit more information to see if I can understand the issue better. Is the snoring that your son is doing more like a whistling sound or an actual snoring? Also, just to be sure, it is present on both inhalation and exhalation, is this correct? If it is present at both times, is it louder during one or the other? Does your son make this sound while awake or only while asleep?

Thanks.
 fierra2000 - Tue Oct 23, 2007 12:18 am

It's definetly a whitling sound but it sounds like when someone's snoring. It is definetely present at both times, inhalation and exhalation, but it is louder when he inhales. My son makes these sounds both when he is awake and asleep, but it is louder when he is awake. When he first falls asleep it starts out really loud and eventually it gets lower as he falls deeper and deeper into his sleep. Still, when he is asleep it is louder when he inhales. Just to be clear, he never stops making the noise, it just goes from high to low depending on what he is doing.
 Dr. Chan Lowe - Thu Oct 25, 2007 7:23 pm

User avatar Hi again,

Sorry for the delay in getting back to you. From this description it sounds like your son likely has a fixed obstruction or compression of his trachea or larynx. Laryngomalacia or tracheomalacia (floppy airway) typically are dynamic obstructions that occur with inspiration but not expiration since the air pressure helps hold them open. Since it is worse on inspiration there may still be a component of one of these floppy airway issues.

I would recommend that your son see either a pediatric pulmonologist or a pediatric ear, nose, and throat doctor. The sound your son is making is called stridor. Possible issues include tracheal rings or (less likely) lower tracheal slings, vocal cord dysfunction/paralysis or other external issues compressing the airway.

Some of these issues, notably the laryngo and tracheomalacia will get better with age (although they may get worse first), others may not resolve without intervention. This may get better as he gets older but it sounds like it is fairly severe and should be further evaluated.

Best wishes.
 fierra2000 - Sat Mar 01, 2008 10:08 am

Thanks for reaching me, my son is now 11 months old and still has the problem. I went to see a pulmonologist and they recomended that I see an ent so that a they can sedate him and look inside for any problems. I will be seing one soon. I will make sure to keep you posted. Again thank you...

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