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Forum Name: Pediatric Topics

Question: 4yr old lungs


 belkin4201 - Thu Sep 15, 2005 11:12 am

I have a 4 yr old son who has had a deep cough and fever off and on. He has been to a doctor four times over the past two months and still has not got better. Here is what they have given him so far. First visit he was given steroids, two breathing treatments and then was prescribed Zithromax, oral steroids, and Albuterol with an inhaler tube. This was stemming from chest x-rays that showed pneumonia and a round spot on his left lung. Went back two weeks later and he was coughing as much so they gave him another breathing treatment and wanted us to keep giving him the Albuterol and bring him back in two weeks. On the third visit they took new x-rays and said that the spot was gone but there was still stuff in his lungs. They gave him another breathing treatment, prescribed more oral steroids and put him on Flonase and another allergy medicine. They said he might have a viral pneumonia and it would just have to run its course. On the forth visit they gave him another breathing treatment and wanted us to keep giving him everything else. They just called and said that they wanted to give him a stronger antibiotic because the radiologist noticed that it had moved into a different part of his lungs. Do these actions sound appropriate? Should I try to get him referred to a pediatric lung specialist? Thanks for you help.
 Dr. Heba Ismail - Fri Sep 23, 2005 3:25 am

Yes, it is quite usual for a viral pneumonia to run a long course, with persistent wheezing and cough, together with minimal or absent fever.
However, I'm not quite sure about the X-ray description you've given, a viral pneumonia usually does not localize into a certain area of the lung, but rather results in a diffuse affection of both lungs. May be, it would be wise to have another opinion about the X-rays.
Conditions which may result in a similar picture is an inhaled foreign body or enlarged lymph nodes causing partial obstruction of the airways, or an atypical micro-organism that has just not been treated properly so far.

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