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The Doctors Lounge - Primary Care Answers

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Forum Name: Sports medicine

Question: Neck burning/tingling


stash - Mon Apr 16, 2007 11:59 am

To whom it may concern: I am a 34 y/o male competitive grappler. I exercise daily, doing a combination of calisthenics, weight lifting, and Jiu-Jitsu/wrestling. Although I can't recall any particular injury and I'm not in pain, when I shrug my left shoulder or lay on my left side, I get a strange tingling or burning sensation up my neck and to my jaw on the left side. This has continued for about 2 weeks, but no change. I'm not in pain but alarmed. I suspected disc compression or a pinched nerve?? Any thoughts?? Thank you for your time in advance.
Marceline F, RN - Tue Apr 17, 2007 8:32 am

Dear Henry,
Aggressive full-body contact sports can cause different types of injuries in the competitors. While you may not recall a specific trauma or incident that may have caused your current neck burning and tingling, it does seem possible that a partial subluxation in the neck may have occurred either acutely or over a period of time. Many competitors have developed a personal style of wrestling or grappling that includes favoring one side over the other, or one angle over another. As you study your opponent prior to a match, these moves may be ones you watch for. At the same time, you too may have developed certain habits of guarding or attack that favor certain angles. Over a period of time the c-spine can succumb to stress or pressure and cause problems in the disks, the disk spaces, and the nerves passing through the spinal column. A Cat Scan of the neck, maybe even an MRI would be a valuable diagnostic tool to help determine if you indeed have any damaged areas in your spinal column. I would certainly have it investigated by a physician prior to any further contact matches, to be sure you do not have something wrong right on the brink of disasterous. Your next match could be your last.

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