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Forum Name: Psychiatric Topics

Question: I wonder if things I watch are against my religion


 HowardCosellFan - Wed Jul 04, 2007 10:13 pm

I am 16 years old, and from about 1997-2003, I suffered from extreme Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. I would spend hours lining up things in my room against the wall when cleaning, touching things 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 times until it "felt right." I would turn my light on and off over and over until it felt right, and would check over and over to see if my bedroom door was locked even though I already knew it was. This was not the only thing that made me know I was OCD.

I know that a lot of people have self-titled themselves sufferers of OCD, but I know that I was.

In 2004 or so, I finally stopped giving into the OCD. It seems that that triggered extreme mood swings. Just watching television it's hard to enjoy the program because I constantly worry about things that do not worry, just really, really obscure things. Finally I'd convince myself it wasn't anything to worry about, and finally after about a few seconds I'd start worrying again. I go through extreme depression with high highs and low lows. Often times, these mood swings are triggered by nothing at all; they just "happen."

Religiously, I will be really religious for about a week ro two, and wonder if things I watch are "against my religion" even though they have nothing bad in them. After a week or two of extreme religion (which I always doubt while following, and constantly struggle in faith), I always fall away for two weeks and eventually come back to faith afterwards.

My dad suffers from extreme bipolarism, and I feel I may have inherited some sort of bizarre mental disorder from his side of the family, and maybe my mom's as well.

What can I do?
 Marceline F, RN - Thu Jul 05, 2007 7:00 am

User avatar Dear HowardCoselFan,
Have you discussed your concerns with your pediatrician? I would strongly recommend that you do so, and follow any advice he/she may have for you. This will probably include a referral to a Mental Health practitioner - either a psychologist or psychiatrist. Our minds are very complex, and they will find a way to make sense of the chaos we find ourselves in - one way or another. Frequently, the sufferer of OCD (obsessive compulsive disorder) has found their life (or portion of their life) out of control. OCD activities are sometimes the mind's way of trying to find sanity in an insane world. If a person has a fear for personal safety, then checking and rechecking door locks, or light switches or gas burner controls is the mind's way of ensuring that safety. Sometimes a fear of loss can trigger a need to count and recount items over and over again as if to reassure one-self that the item is still there. It takes a professional mental health practitioner (and we are indeed dealing with a mental "health" concern) time and one on one communication with the sufferer to help get to the bottom of why the disorder exists and then to address it sufficiently so the person can go on to a calmer and more productive life. You should not need to suffer as you have done without professional help. Please ask your doctor for his/her input. Help may be closer than you think!
 HowardCosellFan - Thu Jul 05, 2007 10:00 am

Thank you Dr. The only thing is, it seems like the OCD hasn't been bother me as much in recent years, and now it's the mood swings/paranoia. Is that a result of not giving into the paranoia?
 HowardCosellFan - Thu Jul 05, 2007 10:00 am

Not giving into the OCD, meant to say.
 Marceline F, RN - Thu Jul 05, 2007 2:33 pm

User avatar Dear HCfan,
Thanks for the feedback . I think you have been incredibly brave and strong to try to fix your thinking all by yourself. However, I sense you still have an underlying distress, and you deserve to not have to be "on guard" all the time. I still recommend you seek out a mental health professional who if nothing else, can validate you. The struggles with faith can be even more energy sapping since faith seems to be our last rampart. For your challenges there, you may try to find a local congregation of your faith to support you.
 Marceline F, RN - Fri Jul 06, 2007 1:47 am

User avatar Dear HC Fan,
I would like to apprise you of the fact that there are Doctors, Registered Nurses and other professional HealthCare Providers who are pleased to answer posts in this forum. Each of us come with a background in medicine which equips us to assist the poster at a variety of different levels. I am a Registered Nurse, and serve as one of the professional forum members. I am happy if we have been able to address your concerns in a constructive manner. Thank you for using DoctorsLounge.

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