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Forum Name: Psychiatric Topics

Question: Excessive swallowing after sinus infection


 drinaldi - Sat Apr 05, 2008 3:30 am

I have been having anxiety attacks for the past three months. They started out of the blue when I had a sinus infection. At first I would just have panic attacks once in a while but soon I had anxiety more and more freguently. During this tiem I started having excess saliva in my mouth and constatnly feeling lie I had to swallow. Then I just started swallowing all the time evenwithout the excess saliva. I have bbenfeeling much better and seem to have the anxiety under control but cannot seem to stop the constant swallowing. I do not have this all the time but it seems to be getting more and more frequent and lasting longer. It started at 3:00 PM yesterday when I was putting groceries sway and I just woke up out of a sound sleep with it at 4:00 AM. I do not think I do it in my sleep. I have treid not to swalllow but then it just happen automatically like a hiccup. It is driving me crazy! What can I do. My chiropractor suggested hypnosis. What do you suggest

drinaldi
 Tim W Latsko - Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:31 pm

drinaldi,

given your presentation,, it sounds like the swallowing is a self-soothing mechanism that developed during your sinus infection to aid you during anxiety producing events. That said, try wearing a rubber band around your wrist and each time you find yourself about to swallow in effort to self sooth, pull on the rubber band or get a stone and put in your pocket and each time you find your about to swallow instead of swallowing reach for the stone.

If you find that you have changed coping mechanisms it is liekly that you are self-soothing and hypnosis has been found helpful in managing anxiety. Equally effective, if not more, is cognitive behavioral therapy and medication.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Tim

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