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Forum Name: Psychiatric Topics

Question: Anorexia Vs. Genetics


 jugglajen - Tue Aug 26, 2008 8:42 pm

The women in my family have been thin until they reach in their late thirtys or early fourties. I am 23, weigh 90lbs, and have 2 children (all naturally) with no pain killers, epidurals, or c-sections. I have run into some trouble with child welfare and my case worker is saying that I have anorexia. I have always been thin. I eat regurally every day and I don't think I am fat or overweight. I voulanterely went to see a doctor and I explained this to her. At first she was going to refer me to a dietician, but after she talked to my case worker she told me that I would have to go to a impatient facility for treatment. I also went to a psychatrist and she told me I don't have anorexia. What should I do? Who should I believe?
 cjones - Thu Aug 28, 2008 9:08 am

you don't say how tall you are... my sister is 5"9' and weighs 8stone (that 112 pounds i guess) she's got 4 kids and conceived them all naturally and had one caesarean cos my neice was breech or something (not sure exactly what).

i reckon she's totally healthy ---- she DOES watch what she eats tho and is into organic and she eats far less than i do (i am also 5"9' but i weigh almost 9stone - which is still fairly thin but as a family we all weigh around the same and my mother too in her sixties, we can all fit into each others clothes etc. etc. - my eldest sister maybe her things are too TIGHT but we can just about wear them).

she eats hardly anything but i wouldn't ever say she was anorexic - she likes to drink a lot of water and eat a lot of vegetables and considering she had four kids in six years or something i don't think it did her any harm!!! she looks great (in that kinda skinny actress/celeb type way) and the rest of us are just a little more relaxed about it - i eat whatever i can, whenever i am hungry - depending on what is in the fridge.

but having watched my sister - i would categorically say that most adults eat WAY MORE THAN THEY NEED TO!

your case-worker obviously has a different point of view but if you are not ill - surely it shouldn't be a problem for her unless you are not feeding your children properly??????? children NEED to eat.

they need cookies and full-fat milk and animal fats as well as vegetables and all good stuff like that because they are growing. my own weird point of view but i think the problem often is at the root source of a lot of the food in the US --- it is devoid of nutrients because the soil has been raped by over-farming with no chance of lying fallow with turnips etc. etc. no sense of the land, no respect for traditional farming - just continually raped and poisoned by Monsanto pesticides and nitrogeon-based fertilisers --- just makes for ***** food. the earth has got nothin' left to give - so it looks great and is worthless. might as well eat the paper plate instead.

the milk too - intensively farmed cows, never seen a blade of grass or a shaft of sunlight. disgusting!! revolting - how can people do that and then expect the end product to have any goodness in it? ugh! milked 24/7 with mastitis and rotting feet and injected with growth hormones --- you reap what you sow. feed that ***** to your child - that's what it is drinking pure, miserable *****.

anyway, that's my rant for the day! but i think you would KNOW if you were anorexic. the question is more are YOUR food habits interfering with the health of your children?
 Dr. Chan Lowe - Thu Aug 28, 2008 12:27 pm

User avatar Hi Jugglajen,

Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that is defined by 4 criteria in women:
1) Inability to maintain at least 85% of ideal body weight
2) Intense fear of gaining weight
3) Body dysmorphisms (i.e. the patient believes she is fat when she is not)
4) Cessation of menstrual period for > 3 cycles.
There are some milder forms of eating disorders that don't meet all these criteria.

One possible suggestion is to go back to previous doctor's visits and look at your weights at those visits. Perhaps you can show that your weight has been stable. In addition, I would expect that the evaluation of a psychiatrist would carry some weight.

Best wishes.

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