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Forum Name: Antidepressants

Question: Can alcohol counter the benefit from my antidepressants?


 whitelabs - Sat Mar 28, 2009 10:55 pm

...more accurately, my wife seems to get ANGRY almost like clockwork around 9pm almost every evening after having 3 to 5 glasses of wine. She is taking a moderate doseage of Adderall for ADD, and she takes a moderate dose of Lexapro and Wellbutrin. My thought is that one to two glasses of wine is one thing, but when she has lets say 4 glasses....is that (a) enough to counter the benefit of the anitdeppressants, and then (b) is that more than anyone should eb drinking on a daily basis? It has been my understanding that the limit on moderate drinking would be 1 to 2 per night. There have been times where she has had the equivalent of a 750ml bottle or more all on her own, and yet I am content with one glass or two. What dangers (if any) are there from drinking at this level?

(a weary husband)
 Debbie Miller, RN - Sun Mar 29, 2009 10:11 am

User avatar Hello,
Alcohol is considered a depressant. Some people feel it makes them feel better so they don't believe this but that is a temporary benefit if any and each person responds differently to drugs - and alcohol IS a drug. When there is noticeable personality change, it seems pretty obvious what the solution would be. Trouble is, if she doesn't buy into that, nobody else can force it. She could agree to a trial to see if there is marked improvement by stopping or at least limiting the alcohol. Some people should not take any alcohol at all because of their own response to it. It is believed there are genes involved in alcoholism which explains why some are addicted so easily and others never are. Recognizing this and being open to the possibilities is important in making life decisions. She may even benefit from being involved with AA while trying to go cold turkey on it.

If she is committed to the relationship and her own well-being, hopefully she will take some positive action. If she decides to take this step, it would help if you would join her in her resolve to remove alcohol from temptation by not using it yourself. Her desire for good mental health is evident in taking the medications and that is commendable. Many people refuse to acknowledge such problems and self-medicate with alcohol or other drugs to counter the negative effects of their disorders.

Good luck to both of you. She needs your love and support.

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