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Forum Name: Psychiatric Topics

Question: Just obsession or a mental disorder??


 atalost - Fri Sep 18, 2009 7:14 pm

Hello. I know someone who is obsessed with the idea that her husband is cheating on her. There are no solid facts, no valid reasons, and she has yet to prove this. She is basing everything on intuition. It is destroying their marriage and yet he is being patient and putting up with her actions because of their children. He has done everything he can to prove otherwise, but every single action of his is incriminating, somehow and only to her.
She doesn't believe or trust in her husband even after all her "evidence" turn out to be inconclusive. They are together 24/7. They work together and drive home together and spend the rest of the nights together. Sometimes, he will go and meet his friends for dinner, and still, she believes he has a mistress. She will pull something out of thin air to make it conclusive. I am worried because her ideas/theories are so ridiculous and unrealistic. She will seldom forget about certain events and will fill it in with her own idea of what happened. There are moments when she will act out and start yelling and making false accusations and the next moment she will be very affectionate, and then she'll just burst into tears.
She is obsessed with this. If she doesn't stop, she will lose her husband and will regret it for the rest of her life. She is causing a lot of unnecessary pain for herself and her entire family.

I'm starting to think that maybe it could possibly be a pyschological/mental or some other underlying health issue.

Help!

-lost
 Debbie Miller, RN - Thu Mar 11, 2010 7:34 pm

User avatar Hello,
It sounds to me like something that should be investigated from a psychiatric perspective. There are disorders that interfere with reality perception such as Borderline Personality Disorder. These can be lethal to relationships. The problem is getting the person to admit there is a real problem and getting the help they need. Nobody can force them into treatment and with some conditions, attempts to help backfire.

If you have a good relationship with her and can have influence, I would definitely recommend that she see a mental health professional - psychiatrist or therapist.

Best wishes.

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