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Forum Name: Psychiatric Topics

Question: Severe breathing problem due to anxiety


 serb2010 - Wed Jul 14, 2010 10:20 pm

All day long i have the feeling of taking a breath in and not being able to go all the way back and get a full good breath. I went did all kinds of test , Ectocardiogram, Chest X ray, breath test, and some other tests. They rulled it out to be anxiety. The doctors didnt tell me what to do and Im going to see a Psychiatrist. I have these problems of breathing all day long and every single day. Anyone have anything similar and any thing I can do to make it better. I don't even think I am anxious but my dad said its cause Im always indoors and don't hang out much with freinds. Your thoughts?
Any help is greatly Appreciated
 Faye Lang, RN, MSW - Fri Jul 16, 2010 2:53 pm

Hello, serb2010,

Since the physical possibilities for your breathing problem have been ruled out, the next reasonable step is to do exactly as you have planned, which is to see a psychiatrist or psychologist. While you don't think you are anxious, anxiety can develop very slowly over time, so that we don't notice it until it begins to interfere with our usual activities. Depression can develop the same way, although either diagnosis can also develop rapidly. When it develops slowly, we adjust to it and continue to think it's our usual, normal selves, until undeniable symptoms, such as your difficulty with breathing, becomes so obvious it can't be ignored. There are many possible diagnoses within the categories of anxiety and phobias, and your anxiety can be specifically identified by the detailed clinical interview that the psychiatrist will conduct with you. Anxiety is very treatable; the most effective treatment usually includes both medication and cognitive-behavioral therapy, or "talk" therapy. Your father's feedback to you may be an indication that those around you have noticed some changes that you haven't recognized. I always suggest keeping a daily record of your symptoms, including when the symptom started, what you were doing at the time, how long it lasted, what helped or made it worse, and any other information that you feel is important. Take your record to all psychiatry and therapy appointments. It helps your treatment providers identify any diagnostic patterns and understand exactly how much it is affecting your life, as well as indicating the best times for medication dosages to be taken. I hope this information is helpful to you, and I wish you the very best of luck.

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