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Forum Name: Psychiatric Topics

Question: Anxiety and Depression over thoughts


 live123118 - Tue Aug 17, 2010 6:10 am

I had a negative thought over my girlfriend which caused me to have a mental breakdown. I was sick and I couldn't eat or sleep right. I have suffered now for 7 months with anxiety and depression and now its affecting my relationship. Because of the anxiety, I am constantly on edge and I fear a break up. Even though we will never break up, I am constantly asking questions like, "do I love her?" When I think of these things I get scared due to anxiety. I cannot tell my self that I love her and its all in my head as my mind has complete control. I am very desperate for some professional advice and any advice or help will be greatly appreciated!

Thank you!
 Faye Lang, RN, MSW - Mon Aug 23, 2010 8:35 pm

Hi -

Anxiety and depression can cause a person to think differently than usual, as well as to narrowly focus on a fear, object, or person. I wonder if you had depressive and anxiety symptoms prior to your focus on your girlfriend, rather than the other way around. When you had the breakdown, did you receive any psychological or medication treatment? It's very difficult to recover without treatment.

There are substances in the human brain called neurohormones that help regulate our emotions; a primary neurohormone in this respect is called serotonin. When the level of serotonin and other neurohormones becomes depleted, depression and anxiety can result. Antidepressant medication helps restore the proper levels of neurohormones in the brain, and antianxiety medications help boost coping skills by relieving much or most of the anxiety. Regular exercise, such as a daily walk or jog (if one's health permits it) also helps boost these neurohormones, as well as providing an alternate focus.

It would be a good idea in this type of situation to discuss symptoms and concerns with a doctor, and talk about the idea of having a psychological or psychiatric consult to help clarify any diagnosis and receive treatment recommendations. Psychological treatment would very likely include cognitive-behavioral therapy, which is talk therapy along with coping methods to overcome major stressors.

It's impossible to determine what your diagnosis might be without a thorough face-to-face evaluation interview. However, the symptoms that you describe do suggest a depression and/or anxiety condition, and you would probably benefit from talking with your doctor.

Good luck to you.

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