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Forum Name: Rheumatology Topics

Question: Lupus - Newly Diagnosed - Having major flare


 mommy23monkees - Thu Aug 12, 2010 9:07 am

I am a 29 yr. old female with three small children. I was just diagnosed last week with Lupus and have yet to see the Rheaumatologist. A month ago I broke out in this horrible rash on my face and hands. I went to the ER, they treated it like an allergic reaction. They also figured out I had thrush and a kidney infection at the same time. I was sent home with meds and told to follow up with my dr. When I followed up with my dr I had a horribly cough and was very short of breath. She indicated it was pleurisy. It has been two weeks now and the only symptom I have had that is very bothersome is fatigue. Last night the rash flared back up again on my face and I feel like I have been set on fire. During the night I woke up with a nose bleed and my left jaw, gums, and teeth throbbing in pain. This morning I woke up with a horrible headache, dizziness, lethargy, vomiting evey 30 minutes, and my face looks worse. I am not really sure what to do at the point. My regular doctor is out of town and I do not have a rheumatologist to contact yet. Should I try to bear the pain and wait it out or should I bother with the ER and try to get some relief? Does any of this sound emergent? I just don't want them thinking I am drug seeking but I am in pain. Also, I am concerned about my symptoms. Please advise on the best course of treatment.
 Faye Lang, RN, MSW - Mon Aug 23, 2010 11:02 pm

Hi -

I apologize that this response is not as timely as you likely had hoped. With the diagnosis of lupus, it's very important to see a rheumatologist at the earliest opportunity. Meanwhile, when symptoms are so acute, if your own doctor isn't available, there is probably someone covering for her who can provide interim treatment. If it's urgent, by all means go to urgent care or the emergency room. The interim treatment may be a short course of steroid therapy, as Prednisone, to reduce the inflammation. There are other medications very useful in the treatment of lupus, including quinine-based medications, immunosuppressants or chemotherapy agents that your rheumatologist may suggest after evaluating your specific symptomatology. It's important that you rest whenever possible, at least until your condition has stabilized, since fatigue is often a factor in lupus.

Good luck to you.

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