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Date of last update: 10/20/2017.

Forum Name: Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

Question: Why is 1/2 of my muscle missing after PDA surgery


 D3AN - Thu Jan 22, 2009 5:33 am

Hi Doctors, I underwent surgery for patent ductus arteriosus as a premature baby. I'm 22 now and half of my pectoral muscle has always been missing where the incision was made. I'm just curious why 1/2 of my muscle is missing. Was it simply not sutured back together? Thanks for any help
 John Kenyon, CNA - Tue Feb 03, 2009 2:14 am

User avatar Hello -

My best guess is that during the surgery, when the muscle was separated, due to the location of the incision and the small scale of you as a premature infant, some of the muscle tissue was simply lost outright or to wasting during the healing process. There is such a huge difference not only in scale but in development between adults and less-than-full-term babies that it would be rather surprising if this hadn't happened.

I hope this answers your question adequately. Good luck to you.
 premedpedcard - Tue Jun 22, 2010 11:03 pm

Something else to think about would be if the nerve that innervates that particular muscle was severed during surgery. That could lead to the atrophy of that muscle group.

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