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Forum Name: Fertility

Question: Why can't I get Pregnant


 Teresalmc - Tue Feb 28, 2006 3:35 pm

I am 30 years old happily married I started my period at age 13 and it has alway been normal first lasting about 2 to 3 days but now that I am older it is about 5 days I never miss on my menstral I have had only 3partners my whole life but I have been trying for 5years and I cant get pregnant. I have been tested for everything I also found out that I have diabetes about two years ago. it is type 2 and I know sometimes it is out of control but I have a decent handle on it my husband has a child from a previous relationship and he has been tested and is normal but for some odd reason I can't get pregnant? growing up I have always been heavy lately I have gone thru a miracluos weight loss losing about 70pounds but I am very healthy and not understanding what is going on with me. ever since I found out that I am diabetic I constantly keep having yeast infections could that be a cause too. I am not sure what I just know I am getting older and I want a child. O yeah when I was 22 yrs old I had a bladder infection that turned into e-coli and was really bad. but it was ok after a week of antibiotics maybe that could be the problem also. I am not sure. can you help me???
 Shana Johnson, CNA - Sat Mar 18, 2006 4:29 pm

User avatar Trying to concieve with diabetes can be tricky. Also, you mentioned a weight loss, so are you now at a normal healthy weight, or are you still overweight?
Being overweight can cause a lot of problems with fertility by itself, and addded to that the complications of diabetes, that could be a major cause for your infertility. So first of all I would recommend that if you are still overweight, that you continue to eat healthy and get exercise to get to your goal weight.

Now to deal with the diabetes part.

First, make an appt with yoru doctor if you haven't already done so and tell him that you are trying to concieve. Your doctor needs to run tests to make sure yoru diabetes is under control enough for you to begin trying to concieve.
Have your urine checked for diabetic kidney complications.
Check your cholesterol and triglyceride levels.
Blood glucose screening: Your doctor will check to see if your blood glucose is in control. Good blood sugar control is important before becoming pregnant because many women do not even know they are pregnant until the baby has been growing for 2-4 weeks. High blood glucose levels early in the pregnancy (before 13 weeks) can cause birth defects. In addition, good blood glucose control is just as important during pregnancy because high blood glucose levels can increase the risk of miscarriage and can increase your risk of developing diabetes complications.
Make medication adjustments: If you take insulin to control your diabetes, your doctor can tell you how to adjust your medication. Generally your body will require more insulin during pregnancy, especially during the last 3 months of pregnancy. If you take oral medications to control your diabetes, your doctor may switch your medication to insulin during pregnancy, since certain oral medications could harm the developing baby.
Meal planning: During pregnancy, you and your health care provider should work together to adjust your meal plan. Changing your meal plan will help you avoid problems with low and high blood glucose levels. Your meal plan will also be adjusted to include more calories for your growing baby.
Before becoming pregnant, start taking a daily vitamin that contains folic acid. Folic acid has been shown to decrease the risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect, such as spina bifida -- a serious condition in which the brain and spinal cord do not form normally. The March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation recommends taking 400 micrograms of folic acid daily before conception and in early pregnancy. Many pharmacies sell over-the-counter prenatal vitamins that do not require a prescription

Good luck

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