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Forum Name: Fertility

Question: Pregnacy after miscarriage


 missdbc - Wed Nov 09, 2005 11:15 am

Hi - I had a miscarriage on Oct. 16th, after only knowing I was pregnant for a few days. My last period was on Sept. 12th. It was a clean miscarriage with cramping and bleeding for only that day, and very little afterward. After the miscarriage, I began to have unprotected sex on Oct. 31st. My breasts have been very sore for the past few days, which was the first symptom of my last pregnancy. Since I do not know when to expect my period (I was told 4 to 6 weeks), when or even should I test? Thank you!
 kewlgirlno1 - Wed Nov 09, 2005 3:39 pm

hi...sorry to hear of ur m/c .. if i were u i would wait another week or so b4 u test,, that would make it 4wks since it happened,, it is very possible u conceived straight away as i have heard it can happen,, loads of luck,,

pam

xx
 precious1976 - Mon Apr 13, 2009 12:26 pm

Hello i had a miscarriage in dec 08 and i was devastated apparently its because i have antibodies in my blood which attacked my baby i am o rhs positive and ive been told that i can concieve again as there are things that they can do,but im just wanting to know what can be done to prevent this happening again? i have 4 children from previous but this was my partners first child and would really like to know what can be done and how? any help or advice would be most appreciated thankyou x
 Debbie Miller, RN - Fri Apr 24, 2009 2:53 pm

User avatar Hello,
The RH factor only is a problem when the mother is Rh Negative; not positive. I am not sure what to advise since it appears we need more information. Is it another condition besides Rh disease?

If you are actually negative and you had a child with positive blood without receiving rhogam within 72 hours of the delivery or loss, your blood antibodies could attack a future pregnancy with a positive baby. In this case the pregnancy is considered high risk but with close monitoring, interventions such as blood transfusions can often resolve the problem, resulting in a healthy delivery, though sometimes they must be delivered early and of course this comes with additional risks.

Testing should be fairly accurate about 2 weeks after conception or around the time one would expect the period to be starting. Follow the directions on the package for accurate results. If negative, this could be a false reading so the test is repeated if your periods has not begun yet by then.

If you have more information we may be able to help you some more.

Best wishes.
 candygirl_84 - Wed May 06, 2009 3:42 pm

i didnt have a miscarriage but i was pregnant due to a rape and i had an abortion. they too had told me that i had a rare blood type and if i was to later conceive after that i had to becareful. in the state i was in i cant really recall exacally what they said that day will always remain a blur to me but all i remember her saying was that with my blood type can make antibodies and its dangerous but why?
 Debbie Miller, RN - Sat Oct 24, 2009 12:20 pm

User avatar Hello,
You should probably consult with a doctor for more information because there are many blood conditions. However, the most common one relating to pregnancy is the Rh factor. If you have negative blood, your body can make antibodies to positive blood. So, if you were to conceive a child with positive blood type and some minute blood was exchanged at delivery, you could make antibodies that could attack future positive babies. However, if this was the case, you should have been given RhoGam to counteract this problem and prevent the antibodies from being a problem in the future. It is possible they did this and were advising you to be certain that any future pregnancies are also followed up with RhoGam (miscarriage, abortion, or delivery) within 72 hours of the event.

They may have wanted to emphasize to you that not getting this could put future babies at risk. Your doctor can determine your blood type if you don't know it and help you understand your health concerns. If it is not Rh factor, the doctor can also either review the previous records (if you give permission for them to be sent) or do an exam with lab work to find out.

It is always a good idea to have regular gynecological exams. I would recommend this.

Best wishes.
 pamezamo - Tue Jun 15, 2010 3:33 pm

I have no idea how to use this site I have a question.. My husband and I started trying to have a baby on the thrid try we got pregnant. We found out 5 days before I was due to start but 3 weeks later I miscarried. It was a natural miscarriage and my body did the work so no D&C was needed. My question is how long to we have to wait before trying again? My doctor says 3 months but I think that seems like a long wait especially since i had no complications and it was more or less a very heavy period with cramping. Time is not on my side as I am 38 years old. I want to hurry and try again but my husband is worried if we do it wil happen again. This is his first baby where as I have already had 7 children. Please can someone tell me why I should wait or if we even have to at all?
 Debbie Miller, RN - Wed Jun 16, 2010 4:34 pm

User avatar Hello,
Unless you have other risk factors, enemia, etc. that your doctor may be aware of there is no reason to wait to try to conceive. They used to advise you to wait at least one cycle for dating purposes (convenience for the doctor to know how far along you are), but these days with ultrasound technology that is really not necessary and there is no reason you need to wait, especially with an early miscarriage.

Best wishes,

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