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Date of last update: 10/15/2017.

Forum Name: Gastroenterology Topics

Question: Small lump on anus


 TeacupHuman - Mon Jun 07, 2010 6:59 am

Hi!

I'm nearly 18 and I have a small lump on my anus that I first noticed a few years ago, but as it doesn't cause me any pain or discomfort I wasn't concerned. It isn't a different colour from the rest of my skin and as far as I can tell it doesn't fit with any symptoms of piles. I also looked up symptoms for colon cancer (just to check) but have nothing similar to what is described. Although there's no pain I'm slightly worried about what it could be.

I would be grateful for any advice. Thank you.
 Dr.M.Aroon kamath - Sun Jul 04, 2010 11:03 pm

User avatar Hi,
As you have missed out many details regarding the swelling, i will provide you with some of the possible causes of a swelling in that vicinity.

Some of the possibilities include,

- a perianal hematoma (slightly bluish, located at the anal margin, follows bleeding from tiny perianal veins as a result of sudden increasing of pressures in them by acts such as coughing, straining at stool etc),

- Condyloma acuminatum: caused by the epidermotropic human papillomavirus (HPV). Perhaps, the most common sexually transmitted disease (STD). It is the third most common cutaneous manifestation in HIV-infected patients, detected in >30% of the seropositive cases.They are usually skin-colored,r pink or whitish.
Risk factors: multiple sexual partners, early coital age, Smoking, & oral contraceptives, are risk factors for acquiring condylomata.

It spreads by skin to skin contact and therefore, actual vaginal or anal intercourse is not mandatory for acquiring this infection.

- Other skin lesions which can occur anywhere such as, nevi, cuteneous malignancies(melanomatous & non-melanomatous) also should figure in the differential diagnosis.

You must show it to your family doctor, as diagnosis in these cases depends a lot on the morphology of the lesion (followed by laboratory testing).
Best wishes!

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