Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

Search Symptoms

Category: Dermatology | Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Effect of UV Exposure on Vitamin D Levels Quantified

Last Updated: June 08, 2010.

Although it may be possible to achieve equivalent doses of vitamin D supplementation with natural sun exposure and oral supplementation, intentional sun exposure may result in serious adverse effects, and oral supplementation is the safest method for increasing vitamin D status, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Although it may be possible to achieve equivalent doses of vitamin D supplementation with natural sun exposure and oral supplementation, intentional sun exposure may result in serious adverse effects, and oral supplementation is the safest method for increasing vitamin D status, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Using the FastRT simulation tool, Vitaly Terushkin, of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, and colleagues determined sun exposure times individuals with different Fitzpatrick skin types living in Boston and Miami would need to achieve serum vitamin D3 concentrations equivalent to 400 or 1000 IU vitamin D in January, April, July and October.

The researchers found that in order for an individual with type III skin with 25.5 percent of their body surface area exposed in Boston from April to October at noon to synthesize 400 IU of vitamin D, the individual would need to spend three to eight minutes in the sun. However, they write that it is hard for individuals in Boston to synthesize vitamin D during the winter months. For all study months, the researchers found that an individual with type III skin in Miami would need to spend three to six minutes in the sun at noon to synthesize 400 IU of vitamin D. All scenarios require a longer duration to attain 1000 IU of vitamin D.

"Although it may be tempting to recommend intentional sun exposure based on our findings, it is difficult, if not impossible to titrate one's exposure. There are well-known detrimental side effects of ultraviolet irradiation. Therefore, oral supplementation remains the safest way for increasing vitamin D status," the authors conclude.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)


Previous: Children of Single Deployed Parents See Doctor Less Often Next: Fatal Medication Errors Rise in July at Teaching Hospitals

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion: