Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

Search Symptoms

Category: Cardiology | Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Internal Medicine | Pharmacy | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Aspirin Found Cost-Effective in Newly Diagnosed Diabetes

Last Updated: June 11, 2010.

In individuals age 40 and older who have been newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, regular aspirin use is a cost-effective strategy, according to a study in the June issue of Diabetes Care.

FRIDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- In individuals age 40 and older who have been newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, regular aspirin use is a cost-effective strategy, according to a study in the June issue of Diabetes Care.

Rui Li, Ph.D., of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, and colleagues used a Markov disease progression model of type 2 diabetes to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the daily use of aspirin (80 mg) in adults aged 40 to 94 who were newly diagnosed in 2006. The model analyzed lifetime costs for five typical diabetes complications: neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy, coronary heart disease and stroke.

The researchers found that aspirin users gained 0.31 life-years or 0.19 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) over a lifetime compared with those not taking aspirin; the incremental cost was $1,700. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of aspirin use was $5,428 per life-year gained or $8,801 per QALY gained.

"Medicare and Medicaid programs cover many drugs and medical technologies with much higher ICERs than our estimated ICERs for aspirin. If we use the conventional $50,000/QALY as the threshold for cost-effectiveness, aspirin use is a very cost-effective intervention for people with newly diagnosed diabetes," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Previous: Care Costs Substantial Before Lumbar Discectomy Next: Stage IV Prostate Cancer Incidence Down, Survival Up

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion: