Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

Search Symptoms

Category: Nephrology | Pathology | Urology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Increasing BMI Linked to Higher Urinary Stone Risk

Last Updated: June 11, 2010.

Increasing body mass index is associated with the presence of several urinary stone risk factors in the urine chemistry, suggesting that weight loss should be part of a urinary stone prevention regimen, according to a study in the June issue of Urology.

FRIDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing body mass index (BMI) is associated with the presence of several urinary stone risk factors in the urine chemistry, suggesting that weight loss should be part of a urinary stone prevention regimen, according to a study in the June issue of Urology.

Brian H. Eisner, M.D., of the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues analyzed 880 individuals evaluated at a metabolic stone clinic. The subjects were placed in quartiles by BMI, and bivariate and multivariate linear regression were used to identify associations between BMI and urine chemistry.

The analyses revealed that increasing BMI was associated with several known risk factors for urinary stone disease. In bivariate analysis in men, increased BMI was associated with increases in urinary levels of sodium, calcium, citrate, calcium oxalate, uric acid and magnesium, along with a decrease in pH. In multivariate analysis, however, it was linked only to increases in calcium oxalate and sodium and decreases in pH. In bivariate analysis in women, increased BMI was associated with significant increases in sodium, uric acid and oxalate, and decreased pH; however, in multivariate analysis, the researchers found a positive association between BMI and urine sodium, creatinine and phosphate, as well as a negative association with sulfate and citrate.

"Just as general recommendations for patients with nephrolithiasis include high voided volumes, low dietary sodium, and low animal protein intake, perhaps weight reduction should be included as part of the counseling of stone-formers to optimize 24-hour urine parameters," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Previous: Music Decreases Pain, Anxiety During Bone Marrow Biopsy Next: Rotavirus Prescribing Information, Labeling Changed

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion: