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September 2008 Briefing - Urology

Last Updated: October 01, 2008.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Urology for September 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

News Media Under-Report Drug Company Funding of Research

TUESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Reports on medication research published in general news media often fail to disclose that the research received pharmaceutical company funding and frequently refer to drugs by brand name rather than using the generic name, according to an article published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Catheter-Free Prostate Treatment Safe and Effective

MONDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The catheter-free lithium triborate laser photoselective vaporization prostatectomy (PVP) is both safe and effective for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia, according to a report in the October issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Incontinence Frequency High Among Female Athletes

MONDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Urinary stress incontinence is common among menstruating, recreational athletes and may lead to discontinuation or alteration of an enjoyed activity, according to the results of a study published online Sept. 26 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Gender Inequity Observed in Hematuria Referral

MONDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Women with an initial episode or first recurrence of hematuria are less likely to receive urological referral in comparison to men of the same age, which may lead to delays in evaluation and diagnosis for serious urological conditions, researchers report in the September issue of Urology.

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Panel Reviews Cryosurgery for Localized Prostate Cancer

THURSDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Cryosurgery is an appropriate primary treatment for certain men with organ-confined prostate cancer, and salvage cryosurgery can be a suitable option for men who have failed radiation therapy, according to a best practice statement published online Sept. 25 in the Journal of Urology.

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Test Using AURKA Gene Points to Bladder Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The Aurora kinase A (AURKA) gene -- which promotes progression in several tumors when overexpressed, including urothelial carcinoma -- may provide a novel biomarker for bladder cancer, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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No Change to 2009 Part B Medicare Premium

MONDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- There will be no change to the Part B Standard Medicare premium in 2009 compared with 2008. This is the first time since 2000 that the premium has not risen over the prior year, according to an announcement by the Department of Health and Human Services' Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

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Needle Core Biopsies of Renal Masses Are Accurate, Safe

MONDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Needle core biopsies are safe and correctly identify benign versus malignant renal tumors in small, asymptomatic renal lesions, according to a report in the October issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Editorial

Many Prostate Cancers Detected After Initial Biopsy

MONDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Although prostate cancer diagnosed in an initial biopsy has higher volume, a significant number of cancers are detected on subsequent biopsies, researchers report in the October issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Editorial

Uric Acid Levels Linked to Kidney Disease

MONDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated uric acid levels are associated with an increased risk of kidney disease, according to the results of a study published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Cranberry Juice May Prevent Urinary Symptoms in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Cranberry juice may protect against asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections in pregnant women, although more research is needed to confirm the findings, according to a report in the October issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Antibiotic Resistance Has Become a Global Pandemic

FRIDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A concerted international and national response, behavior change by consumers and providers, and the development of antibacterial agents are all urgently needed to tackle the global problem of rapidly increasing antibiotic resistance, according to an article published online Sept. 18 in BMJ.

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Lifestyle Changes Increase Telomerase Activity

THURSDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Significant increases in telomerase activity and telomere maintenance capacity were found in patients following a comprehensive lifestyle intervention, according to an article published online Sept. 16 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Obesity and Prostate-Specific Antigen Inversely Related

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- An inverse relationship between obesity and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels exists even among populations with a low prevalence of obesity, and may need to be taken into account when screening men for prostate cancer, researchers report in the September issue of Urology.

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Pelvic Floor Disorders Common Among US Women

TUESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Pelvic floor disorders such as urinary and fecal incontinence, and pelvic organ prolapse affect nearly 25 percent of U.S. women, and are even more prevalent in older and obese women, according to a report published in the Sept. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Phone Counseling Improved Diet During Prostate Cancer

TUESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Telephone-based dietary counseling is effective in increasing vegetable consumption and lowering fat intake in men with prostate cancer, according to research published in the September issue of Urology.

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Protein Important in Colorectal Cancer Development

MONDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- A protein that controls the activity of another protein is important in colorectal cancer development, and two gene variants are associated with bladder cancer, according to two letters published online Sept. 14 in Nature and Nature Genetics.

Abstract - Firestein
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Abstract - Kiemeney
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Painkillers Affect Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels may be reduced by regular use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), according to research published online Sept. 8 in Cancer.

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Height May Affect Risk of High-Grade Prostate Cancer

TUESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood environmental exposure as measured by height has only limited impact on men's overall risk of prostate cancer, but may be associated with risk of high-grade tumors with a poor prognosis, according to the results of a study published in the September issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Stress Incontinence Paper Retracted by The Lancet

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- An article on stress urinary incontinence published in The Lancet in June 2007 has been retracted by the journal due to a report by the Austrian Government's Agency for Health and Food Safety, which pinpointed many irregularities in the research.

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Editorial

High Serum Calcium Linked to Prostate Cancer

THURSDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Men with high levels of serum calcium are at greater risk of developing prostate cancer and dying from the disease, researchers report in the September issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention.

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