Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

Search Symptoms

Category: Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Internal Medicine | Neurology | Pathology | Psychiatry | Radiology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Pattern of MRI Findings Predicts Cognitive Decline

Last Updated: October 14, 2010.

Individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have more cerebral microhemorrhages and an altered iron distribution on magnetic resonance imaging compared with controls, and analysis using a support vector machine (SVM) may identify patients with MCI at higher risk of cognitive decline, according to research published online Oct. 5 in Radiology.

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have more cerebral microhemorrhages and an altered iron distribution on magnetic resonance imaging compared with controls, and analysis using a support vector machine (SVM) may identify patients with MCI at higher risk of cognitive decline, according to research published online Oct. 5 in Radiology.

Sven Haller, M.D., M.Sc., of the University Hospitals of Geneva in Switzerland, and colleagues analyzed data from 69 patients with MCI and 35 healthy controls. The subjects underwent MRI and neuropsychologic tests at baseline, and the MCI group underwent neuropsychologic tests after a year to distinguish between stable and progressive MCI.

The researchers found that at baseline the MCI group had more cerebral microhemorrhages than controls as well as greater iron concentrations in some brain areas. By analyzing susceptibility-weighted images at baseline based on SVM, the researchers were able to identify patients with MCI who later had cognitive decline with a sensitivity of 84 percent and a specificity of 83 percent.

"Our findings point to an accumulation of cerebral microhemorrhage in patients with mild cognitive impairment that is present at baseline, independent of subsequent cognitive decline, as well as altered iron distribution in subcortical nuclei. SVM analysis of susceptibility-weighted imaging data at baseline helped identify individual patients with mild cognitive impairment who subsequently experienced cognitive decline," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Previous: Stent and CABG Patients Have Similar Mortality Risk Next: Bioavailable Testosterone Linked to Lower Alzheimer’s Risk

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion: