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Hyperthyroidism Linked to Stroke Risk in Young Adults

Last Updated: April 02, 2010.

Young adults with hyperthyroidism are at higher risk of suffering ischemic stroke than those in their age group without the condition, according to a study published online April 1 in Stroke.

FRIDAY, April 2 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults with hyperthyroidism are at higher risk of suffering ischemic stroke than those in their age group without the condition, according to a study published online April 1 in Stroke.

Jau-Jiuan Sheu, M.D., of Taipei Medical University Hospital in Taiwan, and colleagues studied 28,584 subjects aged 18 to 44 years, including 3,176 subjects with hyperthyroidism and 25,408 subjects without the condition. The subjects were individually tracked for five years for the incidence of ischemic stroke.

The researchers found that a total of 198 of the subjects suffered ischemic strokes during the study period, including 31 (1.0 percent) of the hyperthyroidism patients and 167 (0.6 percent) of the subjects without hyperthyroidism. After adjusting for gender, age, level of urbanization, income, diabetes, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, hyperlipidemia, coronary heart disease and antiarrhythmic use, the researchers calculated that the hyperthyroidism patients had a 44 percent higher risk of stroke than the subjects without the condition.

"Our study shows an association between hyperthyroidism and the risk of subsequent ischemic stroke in young adults. Because a more thorough evaluation may help elucidate the etiology of stroke in young adults, our results indicate a need for thyroid function testing and detection of hyperthyroidism in surveys to identify the etiology of ischemic stroke in young people," the authors write.

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