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Sweet Drinks May Lead to Metabolic Syndrome, Type 2 DM

Last Updated: December 16, 2010.

Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, according to research published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

THURSDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is associated with development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, according to research published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

Vasanti S. Malik, of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues used 11 prospective cohort studies (eight for type 2 diabetes, three for metabolic syndrome) between 1966 and May 2010 from the MEDLINE database for a random-effects meta-analysis comparing SSB intake in the highest to lowest quantiles in relation to risk of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

The researchers found that, of the 310,819 participants and 15,043 cases of type 2 diabetes in the diabetes studies, individuals in the highest quantile of SSB intake (most often one to two servings per day of sodas, fruit drinks, and energy and vitamin water drinks) had a 26 percent greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those in the lowest quantile (none or one serving per month). Among the studies evaluating metabolic syndrome, including 19,431 participants and 5,803 cases, the researchers found that the top quantile had a 20 percent greater risk of developing metabolic syndrome than the bottom quantile.

"This meta-analysis has demonstrated that higher consumption of SSBs is significantly associated with development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. It provides further support to limit consumption of these beverages in place of healthy alternatives such as water to reduce obesity-related chronic disease risk," the authors write.

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