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Study Explores Cardiac Issues in People With Type 2 Diabetes

Last Updated: December 17, 2010.

Diastolic dysfunction found in type 2 diabetes may be associated with both regional signs of sympathetic integrity and clinical evidence of autonomic neuropathy, according to research published in the December issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

FRIDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Diastolic dysfunction found in type 2 diabetes may be associated with both regional signs of sympathetic integrity and clinical evidence of autonomic neuropathy, according to research published in the December issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

Julian W. Sacre, of the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, and colleagues analyzed data from 114 patients with type 2 diabetes, who underwent echocardiography, color tissue Doppler, and cardiovascular autonomic function testing; a subgroup underwent assessment of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) with iodine 123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) imaging.

The researchers found that 16 patients had CAN. Early diastolic tissue velocity was associated with CAN, as seen by total spectral power and heart/mediastinum ratio. Patients with CAN had decreased early diastolic tissue velocity and peak systolic tissue velocity at rest and exercise. Regional tracer deficits suggesting local denervation were seen in anterior and lateral walls. Regional 123I-MIBG uptake was associated with regional early diastolic tissue velocity only in the mid-anterior and mid-lateral walls. However, regional denervation wasn't associated with systolic or diastolic dyssynchrony.

"Although CAN has been proposed to be the basis of left ventricular dysfunction, demonstration of a cause and effect relationship in nonischemic diabetic cardiomyopathy may have significant therapeutic implications. A welcome manuscript by Sacre et al offers a strong argument," conclude the authors of an accompanying editorial.

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