Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

Search Symptoms

Category: Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Orthopedics | Anesthesiology & Pain | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Few Performance Tests Measure Low Back Pain Change

Last Updated: January 03, 2011.

Sit-to-stand and stair-climbing performance tests used to gauge effectiveness of treatment for low back pain are good instruments to use to measure changes over time and to determine the percentage of minimal clinically important change, but several other performance tests are not responsive, according to a study published in the Dec. 15 issue of Spine.

MONDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Sit-to-stand and stair-climbing performance tests used to gauge effectiveness of treatment for low back pain are good instruments to use to measure changes over time and to determine the percentage of minimal clinically important change (MCIC), but several other performance tests are not responsive, according to a study published in the Dec. 15 issue of Spine.

Eleonor I. Andersson of the University of Linköping in Sweden, and colleagues administered the five-minute walking, 50-feet walking, sit-to-stand, one-minute stair climbing, loaded forward reach, and Progressive Isoinertial Lifting Evaluation tests to 198 people with chronic lower back pain before and after 10 weeks of treatment. The researchers evaluated the responsiveness and the MCIC of the tests.

The investigators found that the sit-to-stand and stair-climbing tests were the only two performance tests with adequate responsiveness. For the sit-to-stand test, the MCIC ranged from 4.1 to 9.8 seconds (19 to 45 percent of the mean baseline score). For stair climbing, the MCIC range was 14.5 to 23.9 steps (19 to 31 percent of the mean baseline score).

"We believe that the general lack of responsiveness of the performance tests can be overcome, at least partly, by using a test battery that tests multiple attributes, or by using and/or developing individualized performance tests so that the tests can be targeted at a level of difficulty suitable for the individual and be sensitive to the improvement the individual makes," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Previous: December 2010 Briefing - Pharmacy Next: Cerebral Oxygen Predicts Risks in Cardiac Surgery Patients

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion: