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Cerebral Oxygen Predicts Risks in Cardiac Surgery Patients

Last Updated: January 03, 2011.

Low preoperative cerebral oxygen saturation may be predictive of adverse outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, according to research published in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

MONDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Low preoperative cerebral oxygen saturation (ScO2) may be predictive of adverse outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, according to research published in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

Matthias Heringlake, M.D., of the University of Lübeck in Germany, and colleagues studied preoperative ScO2 levels and 30-day and one-year mortality and morbidity data in 1,178 cardiac surgery patients with already low ScO2 levels. Their objective was to determine the relationship between oxygen levels, cardiopulmonary variables, morbidity, and mortality in this patient population.

The median minimal preoperative oxygen supplemented ScO2 was 60 percent, and the saturation level correlated with cardiopulmonary functioning, with a level at or below 50 percent standing as an independent risk factor for 30-day and one-year mortality.

"Preoperative ScO2 levels are reflective of the severity of cardiopulmonary dysfunction, associated with short- and long-term mortality and morbidity, and may add to preoperative risk stratification in patients undergoing cardiac surgery," the authors write.

Heringlake disclosed financial relationships with Covidien and Roche Diagnostics.

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