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January 2011 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Last Updated: February 01, 2011.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for January 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Tonofovir Appears Effective, Safe Long-Term for HBV

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), which has been identified as superior to adefovir dipivoxil for treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) through 48 weeks, also appears safe and effective as a long-term monotherapy, according to research published in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

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In Asians, Many Polyps <10 mm Have Advanced Histology

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Many polyps smaller than 10 mm in Asian patients have advanced histologic features, so Asian patients with polyps larger than 5 mm should be referred for colonoscopy and polypectomy rather than computed tomography colonography (CTC) surveillance, according to a study published in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Radiofrequency Ablation, Surgery Equal in Small HCC

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Overall survival is comparable for patients with small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with surgical resection (SR) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA), according to a study published in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Magnetic Resonance Imaging Classifies Liver Cancer

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological biopsy analysis are both efficient methods for subtyping hepatocellular adenomas (HCAs), according to a study published online Jan. 12 in Hepatology.

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With Typical Autoimmune Hepatitis Labs, Biopsy Unneeded

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with clinical features of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) are likely to have a compatible liver histology and may not need to undergo a liver biopsy, according to a study published in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Brain Response to Rectal Distension Different in IBS

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) experience greater brain activation in regions associated with emotional arousal and endogenous pain modulation when subjected to rectal distension, compared to controls, according to a meta-analysis published in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

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Resection of Colorectal Liver Metastases Ups Survival

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Two-stage resection (TSR) is associated with good outcomes for patients with advanced colorectal liver metastases (CLM) compared to those treated nonsurgically, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Peginterferon Promising for Hepatitis Delta Virus

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Peginterferon alfa-2a, with or without adefovir, shows promise in the treatment of hepatitis delta virus (HDV), according to research published in the Jan. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Electronic Health Records May Not Improve Care Quality

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) and clinical decision support (CDS) do not appear to improve the quality of clinical care, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Rotavirus Vaccination Prevents Hospital-Acquired Infection

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of community-based rotavirus vaccination is linked to a reduction in the number of children who are hospitalized with community-acquired rotavirus infection, and may prevent hospitalized children from getting infected with rotavirus, according to research published online Jan. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Using Biologic Agents in Older Patients With IBD Poses Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of patients older than 65 years of age with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors is associated with a high rate of severe infections and mortality, according to a study published in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Hepatitis B Virus Identified by Nucleic Acid Testing

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Triplex nucleic acid testing detected potentially infectious, non-seroconverted hepatitis B virus (HBV), HIV, and hepatitis C virus DNA in blood donations, according to a study published in the Jan. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Repeated Acetaminophen Can Cause Infant Liver Failure

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Acetaminophen is generally considered child-safe, but repeated doses in infants can result in acute liver failure, according to a case report published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

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FDA: Severe Liver Injury Tied to Dronedarone (Multaq)

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care professionals and patients of the risk of acute liver failure associated with the heart medication dronedarone (Multaq).

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Metabolic Syndrome Increased in Liver Transplant Recipients

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of liver transplant recipients develop post-transplantation metabolic syndrome (PTMS), putting them at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the January issue of Liver Transplantation.

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CDC Report Highlights Important Health Disparities

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Among Americans, disparities in income, race and ethnicity, gender, and other social attributes have an impact on whether an individual is healthy or ill or will die prematurely, according to a report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, released as a supplement to the Jan. 14 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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FDA Limits Acetaminophen in Combo Prescription Products

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is requesting that manufacturers of prescription combination products containing acetaminophen limit the amount of acetaminophen to a maximum of 325 mg in each tablet or capsule to reduce the risk of liver toxicity. In addition, the agency is directing manufacturers to update labels of all prescription combination products to warn consumers of the possible risk for severe liver injury.

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Burnout Levels Particularly High in Residents

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of burnout and risk for burnout are high in physicians, particularly residents, and more than a quarter of anesthesiology chairs meet criteria for high burnout, according to two articles published in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

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Region Affects Race Disparity in Colorectal Cancer Screening

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Colorectal screening among the nonwhite population in the United States appears to vary according to region compared to whites, who have little geographic variation in colorectal screening, according to a study published online Jan. 15 in Cancer.

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Physical Activity Lowers Risk of Colon Cancer Death

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- People who participate in long-term physical activity have a decreased risk of death from colon cancer, according to a study published in the December issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Bone Disease Common in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Osteoporosis appears to be common among patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), with older age, low body mass index (BMI), and long duration of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) potential predictors of bone disease, according to a study published in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

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Medical, Surgical Treatment of Pancreatic Necrosis Compared

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Conservative primary treatment of infected pancreatic necrosis (IPN) with antibiotics and percutaneous drainage has a higher 10-year survival rate than does surgical necrosectomy, according to a study published in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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KRAS Mutations Predictive of CRC Treatment Failure

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with KRAS mutations treated with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR)-based therapy for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) appear to experience reduced survival and higher treatment failure rates, according to a review published in the Jan. 4 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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High Folate Levels Tied to Silenced Tumor Suppressors

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Higher blood levels of folate may result in the methylation of two tumor-suppressing genes in colorectal tissue, according to research published in the December issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

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Rifaximin Improves Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The use of rifaximin for the treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) without constipation appears to improve relief of IBS symptoms, according to research published in the Jan. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Genes Linked to Gallstone Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Two major genetic risk factors, ABCG8 and UGT1A1, contribute largely to the risk of gallstone disease, specifically in men, according to a report published in the December issue of Gastroenterology.

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Severe Skin Lesions Can Cause IBD Patients to Quit Therapy

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Severe skin lesions cause patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to discontinue anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) therapy, according to research published in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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EUS-Guided Injections Safe for Treating Pancreatic Cysts

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided injection of ethanol and paclitaxel appears to be a safe and relatively effective method for treatment of cystic lesions of the pancreas (CLPs), resulting in a 62 percent complete resolution rate, according to research published in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

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Six Lots of Acetadote Injection Voluntarily Recalled

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Cumberland Pharmaceuticals Inc. have notified health care professionals of a recall of six lots of acetylcysteine (Acetadote) injection (20 percent solution [200 mg/mL] in 30 mL single dose glass vials) due to the potential presence of particulate matter.

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Colonoscopy Offers Strong Protection Against CRC

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Colonoscopy may be associated with a strongly reduced risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), with risk reduction observed for both left-sided and right-sided CRC, according to research published in the Jan. 4 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Clostridium Difficile Infection Up in Hospitalized Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) appears to be increasing among hospitalized children, with especially high risk among children with inflammatory bowel disease or other conditions requiring antibiotics or immunosuppression, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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