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Acne Impacts Adolescents’ Quality of Life

Last Updated: March 24, 2011.

Adolescents who suffer from acne are more likely to have a lower quality of life and psychological disorders, including anxiety, depression, and suicide ideation, according to research published in the January issue of the Dermatology Online Journal.

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who suffer from acne are more likely to have a lower quality of life and psychological disorders, including anxiety, depression, and suicide ideation, according to research published in the January issue of the Dermatology Online Journal.

Lauren K. Dunn, Ph.D., from the Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C., and colleagues determined the impact of acne on quality of life, and its effect on self-esteem, mood, and psychological disorders in adolescents aged 13 to 18 years. The researchers conducted a systematic review of 16 published studies evaluating the effect of acne on self-esteem (four studies), quality of life (five studies), personality and mood (two studies), and psychological disorders (five studies). The impact of successful acne treatment with isotretinoin on psychological disorders was assessed.

The researchers found that the presence of acne had a significant impact on adolescents' self-esteem and quality of life. Acne was linked to increased incidence of anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation. Acne treatment with isotretinoin was found to improve quality of life and decrease depressive symptoms.

"Acne is associated with an increased incidence of anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation," the authors write. "A strong physician-patient relationship and thorough history taking may help to identify patients at risk for the adverse psychological effects of acne."

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