Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

Search Symptoms

Category: Endocrinology | Internal Medicine | Nephrology | Pathology | Urology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Better Models Predict Kidney Disease Progression

Last Updated: April 11, 2011.

A model incorporating routine laboratory tests appears accurate in predicting progression to kidney failure in patients with chronic kidney disease, and combining three markers of kidney disease better classifies patients at risk of end-stage kidney disease and death, according to two articles published online April 11 in the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with presentation at the World Congress of Nephrology, held from April 8 to 12 in Vancouver, Canada.

MONDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- A model incorporating routine laboratory tests appears accurate in predicting progression to kidney failure in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and combining three markers of kidney disease better classifies patients at risk of end-stage kidney disease and death, according to two articles published online April 11 in the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with presentation at the World Congress of Nephrology, held from April 8 to 12 in Vancouver, Canada.

Navdeep Tangri, M.D., of Tufts Medical Center in Boston, and colleagues developed and validated predictive models for progression of CKD in two cohorts of patients in which 386 of 3,449 and 1,177 of 4,942 had kidney failure. They found that a model using serum calcium, serum phosphate, serum bicarbonate, serum albumin, age, sex, estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR) rate, and albuminuria could accurately predict progression to kidney failure in patients with stage 3 to 5 CKD.

Carmen A. Peralta, M.D., of the San Francisco VA Medical Center, and colleagues categorized 26,643 subjects into eight groups according to eGFR determined by creatinine and cystatin C levels to evaluate whether combining creatinine, cystatin C, and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) could accurately classify patients at risk for kidney failure and death. They found that the triple marker approach more accurately reclassified people and distinguished prognostic differences.

"Adding cystatin C to the combination of creatinine and ACR measures improved the predictive accuracy for all-cause mortality and end-stage renal disease," Peralta and colleagues conclude.

Three authors of the second article disclosed receiving research support from Amgen, which provided funding for the study.

Abstract - Tangri
Full Text
Abstract - Peralta
Full Text
Editorial
More Information


Previous: Neurocognitive Impairment Up in Childhood Cancer Survivors Next: American Association for Cancer Research, April 2-6, 2011

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion: